Adam Lewis

Adam Lewis
World Trade Center

  “BROTHER OF MINE, THERE WAS SO LITTLE TIME”
by Pamela Passaretta

That September morning
I will never forget
My little brother Adam
Was stuck in a pit

He was in the second tower
Figuring some stocks out
Watching people fall
Hearing people shout
Helping people get out

He thought that was all
But little did he know
The towers would come down
And all that would remain
Would be his soul

Brother of mine
There was so little time
But we did shine
Kind you were and on the spur
You gave to me
What I can’t forget
The joy to be me – free
Without regret!

That September morning
Was a cold blow
My brother Adam
Became a real hero

He called his wife and children
Talked to his mom
Saying “I Love You” everything's OK
Not to worry
That this was just a crazy day

Brother of mine
There was so little time
But we did shine
Kind you were and on the spur
You gave to me
What I can’t forget
The joy to be me – free
Without regret!


That September morning
I watched it all on CNN
My little brother Adam
Helping others
Till the end


 
Since that day I have been filled with sadness and despair more painful than anything I could have had a nightmare about. The strong love and admiration my brother and I shared is stamped on my heart forever. It's just that I miss his big bear hugs, his laughter, his advise, his warm ear, his funny teasing, his respect and caring. My little brother Adam was 36 that horrific day. He was the most beautiful and loving person I know. The best brother/In-law, son, father of 4 little one's, husband and above all, most trusted friend. He was a giver to the utmost generosity, without any strings attached. His family and friends were everything to him. His sole purpose in life was dedicated to cherish, provide and nurture his wife and children. He was devoted and loyal to his family, friends and colleagues at work. He balanced it all with extreme grace and commitment. We all looked up to him and wanted to be more like him – the funny thing is, he didn't even realize that. He was so humble and down to earth, easy to be with.

Anyway it has been a rocky road these last several months. My husband and I relocated from DC to Connecticut to be close to Adam's wife and children. We feel good about it, though processing grief and family dynamics have been very difficult. Fortunately my husband Angelo (my real life Angel!) has been my rock. And thanks to all my friends at Delta I've been able to keep my life focused and stable. Coming to work has been my sanctuary. I felt and still feel whole, a reason to continue living and helping people. I have a purpose with the warmth and security of everybody. Performing my daily tasks on the job gave me strength and pride to be a part of this company and industry. Not fear, but perseverance. I'm grateful for my life and lucky to be a part of such a powerful and upbeat, great team of special people. God Bless you all and lots of love to ya’ll! Adam and all the loved one's of the world and of that infamous day, are with us always and behind the scenes making miracles. They are not forgotten or lost. I share this bit of comfort and faith.
Tribute submitted by Pamela Passaretta NYC F/A.


When I met Adam Lewis at 10 years of age he had the most wonderful feeling of security and freedom, this has inspired him not to see any limitations to have a large family and children in his adult life. He lived a most unique life with his mother, father and two sisters, Pamela and Kathy, in a small Spanish Morrocan town with walking streets. He knew persons from all walks of life and large Spanish families, poor and happier than ever mixed with artists from all over the world.

He was most attached to his mother with whom he had, during the years, the most unusual, enriching emotional experiences and travel adventures. He had a wonderful sense of responsibility and discipline from his father, who was a lawyer. All of this has helped him to see no limitations in work and human relationships, which was noticeable in his charisma with friends and work relationships - giving love and light to everyone he touched. He came back to live in the USA, and felt like the luckiest human being with opportunities and freedom.

Due to my close relationship with his mother, I continued having close contact with him, as he never failed his care and loving relationship with her and the people that surrounded her. When my kids grew up enough to go to visit him in USA, they were accepted in his house as a part of the family, and that is how we've always looked upon him: a very dear friend and part of our family.

He was in the Hall of Fame at Dalton College in NYC and excelled getting scholarships for both sports and academics, even being a coach for handicapped children. He worked as the vice president for KBW at WTC. As hard as it may seem, he might have fulfilled his goal in life with a wife and four children, and lived life to the fullest at 36 years old, when his life was ended in the most tragic event in WTC. I have no doubt that he would have helped everyone around him, and he was a real hero in the last moment of his life.
Tribute submitted by Alicia Gonzalez Sterling.


He Wanted More Children


Adam Lewis couldn't imagine a family that was too big. With his wife, Patti, he had four children, but he would have been happy with more.

It was his reaction to having grown up in such a small family. For much of his youth, it was just him and his father, sharing one room in the Bronx. There were two single beds against the walls at one end of the apartment and a tiny black-and-white television set resting on a folding chair at the other end. The miniature kitchen contained a round table where the two ate dinner and Mr. Lewis did his homework.

"He was a poor kid in the Bronx, and he got a full scholarship to Dalton and Hamilton College, and achieved the American dream," said Stephen Sander, a close friend.

Mr. Lewis, 36, was a senior trader at Keefe, Bruyette & Woods, but the three biggest things in his life were family, friends and food. He didn't care much for fancy wines or designer clothes or expensive stereo systems, but he did care for the relationships with his family and friends. He loved music but owned maybe five CD's that were played repeatedly: Simon and Garfunkel, Billy Joel, Fleetwood Mac, Creedence Clearwater Revival and the sound track to "Forrest Gump."

Mr. Lewis dearly loved his father, who died in his arms after battling cancer. "I can only pray that they are with each other now," Mr. Sander said at the memorial service for Mr. Lewis, "sitting on a comfy leather couch watching football on a wide- screen TV."

Profile published in THE NEW YORK TIMES on November 7, 2001.




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