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July 17, 2018

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Preview Entry
July 17, 2018

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 Memories & Condolences
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December 3, 2017
Larry was a wonderful man and along with his marvelous wife Joy, were a great help to me. Larry developed my first chemistry Professor Roskos, then taught me and on to Dow Corning where I enjoyed 31 years in the lab playing, inventing, building business. It all starts with the basics PV=nRT and structure property relationships Larry so loved to challenge us with.

I wish I knew of his memorial. I would have been there for I visited each time I was in Ann Arbor. Thank you Rollie and Larry for my career.
November 26, 2017
I met Larry through Alpha Chi Sigma; he helped me organize the lecture series named in honor of his father when I was a undergraduate student at Michigan in 1998-1999. From that initial interaction, I spent hours discussing science and life with him and his wife, Joy.

After medical and graduate studies, I returned to Ann Arbor where I would talk with Larry for hours. Whenever I was on campus I would pop by his office to chat or bring sweet treats. Listening to him discuss his current research or events in science always inspired me in my career. In the years after Joy's passing, Larry and I would go to lunch every month.

(I still have the hardest time calling him Larry- every meal or outing we had always consisted of two conversations 1) why I should call him Larry and not Dr. Bartell and 2) why even though I invited him, it is inappropriate for me to pay.)

In the 20 years from my first encounter with Dr. Bartell, I gained a friend in addition to a mentor. Our conversation ranged from science to the existence of God, from Michigan football to relationship goals. We talked about ever imaginable ongoing support in Chemistry and Biology from his work on the Manhattan Project to mine on the Human Genome Project and everything in between. We laughed a lot and in the last couple years, we reflected a lot.

Stating that he will be missed does not do his impact on my life justice.
October 19, 2017
I was Dr. Bartell's undergraduate research assistant at Michigan, from 1974-1977. He was unforgettable, and was a major influence on my personal and scientific life. I was his co-author on my first scientific publication (the Nature paper on electron wave holography, 1977 or thereabouts). He was never easy, but always himself, very nice and inside a real softie, however this latter aspect was not as well known as his other qualities. He was simply an amazing person.

I had the priviledge of knowing his wife Joy, and they both attended our wedding on New Year's Eve in 1977.

I was a Research Staff Member at IBM Research for many years, and in the early 90's I made a discovery that I was sure would surprise him. It was the single line 13C NMR spectrum of C60, obtained after an heroic effort from laser deposited fullerenes from laser ablation of graphite; sub-milligram sample amounts, which was key to the STM results. I called him, and to my utter amazement he responded by telling me he knew all about it, and although we had the Raman spectra result, unbeknownst to me Sir Harry Kroto had beaten us by several days on the single line NMR. I had forgotten that he basically was omniscient. He did like our subsequent work on metallo-fullerenes and rotational dynamics of C60, but he was very difficult to impress.

I visited him at his office in Michigan in 2013, 14 and 15. Great discussions. The last time I brought up a perpetual motion problem he posed to us way back, which for some reason I would remember about every 6 months over the years but never solve. When I brought it up, hoping for the answer, he instead told me of how only one person had ever worked it out and that person went on to do biochemistry at ... etc. Classic. I stopped him and said 'fine, I'll work it out myself,' and I did, to his approval for this belated effort.

I had the greatest respect for Larry, and I idolized him from the first time I talked to him.

Rest In Peace, Professor Bartell.
October 12, 2017
You will be greatly missed.