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Conrad Fink
Conrad Fink (Associated Press)

Conrad Fink

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April 19, 2014
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April 19, 2014
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Please don't submit copyrighted work; original poems, songs or prayers welcomed.

Legacy.com reviews all Guest Book entries to ensure appropriate content. Our staff does not correct grammar or spelling. Privacy Policy | Terms of Use
March 10, 2012
I always felt privileged to be able to count Con as friend. Our conversations were all too rare, since we only once when we first met lived in the same town, but they were always stimulating. I loved his stories from his days as a foreign correspondent, particularly how he scooped the other wire services on the death of Nehru. He was brave at the end when he told me that he was "in for it." I will miss him a lot. George Melloan
February 08, 2012
Profoundly convincing in 1983, Fink unlocked his office door for me. For 20 minutes he shared a vision of the coming information age, and ways I could capture the moment of a lifetime. Challenged me to abandon distractions like football, fraternities and women to find a greater good in purpose. He knew God was using him even if I had not realized the impact. He was late to his own class for perhaps the very first time. And I am forever in his debt. My first mentoring moment. Of course, on the way out he commented, "Wish I could have gotten to you sooner."

I added as many classes of his for which I would qualify before graduating in 1985. He threw The Wall Street Journal halfway across the classroom at me on the first day. It was so rich to be in his path. Mostly kicking and screaming for mercy from his prowess.

He allowed me to serve as treasurer and later president of his Media Management Club of Georgia. Kicked my tail to open doors with the Atlanta Journal as the first multi-discipline intern going through 26 areas of operation. Through him I had the privilege of being featured in Delta's Sky magazine and inclusion in his text books.

Fink's leadership, encouragement and sage counsel helped me to launch two publishing companies and serve at eight different newspapers across the U.S. My children and I have jointly authored four titles which are sorely in need of Fink's mastery.

Among the greatest privileges I have ever received was an invitation to share my story with his class at UGA. Never have I been so nervous to do my very best. He brought that quality out in all of us. We were his and he was ours. The stories he brought to life were so vivid. I could tell them for hours, but not like Conrad could. Through him I understand the thin line of life between the heavy fire of combat overseas and the sunbeam of peace shining through a bullet hole in the tent.

Peace and blessings to you Sue, Karen, Stephan and brother Don.
January 23, 2012
Professor Fink brought so much to the classroom simply by being who he was. I was not the type of journalism student prone to getting in Fink's good graces, though perhaps he did remember me, even if it was not for a reason I would have liked. I once nodded off in his class. (It wasn't his fault. I was having a bad day.) As I was drifting I heard a clap of the hands that may as well have been a thunderclap followed by, "Wake her up! She'll fall on her head!" The mere thought of Fink addressing me in his class was enough to jolt me into a state of alertness, where I remained completely embarrassed for the rest of the period. Of the lessons Fink taught me, there are two that stand out the most: the grammar rule more rain, fewer drops, and the idea that real-life experience will get you so much farther than a graduate degree in our field. Perhaps unconventional advice, but when leading by example as he did, it was difficult to dispute. My first internship at a trade publication was a stepping stone on my path to working for a cable network, and to this day I remain grateful to Fink for his impact on my college experience. It may have seemed small at the time, but it has made a difference. I pray that he knows his life's work was an inspiration. My prayers are with his family. -Grady College class of 2002
January 21, 2012
We found in Conrad a man who loved his wife, two children, brother and sisters. He was proud of his time with the Associated Press and, even more, his long years of teaching his true love - journalism. On an all too brief visit in New York state, we also found a man who enjoyed fellowship and laughter. We deeply regret the all-to-brief time we had with Conrad, but relish the memory of a wise and brave man. Jack & Phyllis Leach
January 20, 2012
My thoughts are with the Fink family. There will never be another like him. He was a true mentor and friend. I took every class I could with him, sometimes two at a time, and he always believed in me. I carry part of him with me always...in every word I write, and in every young student that I mentor. None of us will ever forget, and his legacy will live on through those he mentored.

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