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1960 - 2017 Obituary Condolences Gallery
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July 19, 2018

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Preview Entry
July 19, 2018

Please don't submit copyrighted work; original poems, songs or prayers welcomed. Legacy.com reviews all Guest Book entries to ensure appropriate content. Our staff does not correct grammar or spelling.

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 Memories & Condolences
This Guest Book will remain online permanently courtesy of Starks Funeral Parlor.
November 14, 2017
There were two funerals I could have attended today. Should have, actually. But a meeting this afternoon I absolutely could not move dictated that I only attend the one in the morning, which was a funeral mass.

I could learn something about reverence from the parishioners I saw kneeling attentively in their pews as they waited for the service for my friend and longtime professional colleague Debbie Adams to begin.

Like me, Debbie went to architecture school late in life, but for different reasons. Once, while Debbie and I were traveling with a group of architects and contractors pursuing a commission to design and build a National Guard readiness center (armory) in Afton, Wyoming, Debbie told me her story in a bit more detail. If I remember correctly, she grew up in Big Piney, Wyoming and was almost always found riding her horse. Again, if memory serves, after high school in Wyoming, she started school at CU. She got a year or so into he studies before her schooling was tragically interrupted.

An accident left her in a wheelchair.

It took Debbie years before she was sufficiently healed, strengthened, and able to resume her educationthis time at the University of Utah, where she found her place in the architecture program.

I first met Debbie when she came to work at GSBS Architects, where I was at the time. She had just graduated, but had far more maturity than most emerging professions starting their internship. I watched as she attained her license handily, unlike many when they start out.

With her personal perspective, Debbie became an expert on universal designdesign that is accessible to everyone, regardless of ability. She trained architects up and down the Wasatch Front on how to respond with architectural solutions to accommodate those with differing abilities.

Ultimately, Debbie and I went our separate ways, only to reconnect years later. I joined CRSA and went on to become a principal. Debbie had worked for a couple of different firms, but one day she called me out of the blue to see if we had any employment opportunities. I jumped at the chance. She joined the studio I led. I still remember bringing a chair forward to join her during that Wyoming National Guard interview. She had rolled up to the banquet table, right across from where our military and civilian selection committee sat. We put our graphic presentation boards under their noses. She said her piece and I said mine. Ultimately, we got the job.

Among the photos of Debbie on easels in the lobby of the St. Vincent de Paul Catholic Church, I saw a single photo of an architectural project proudly displayedthat same National Guard Readiness Center in her home state that she and I had worked on together.

In all the years I knew and worked with Debbie, I never heard her complain or act in any way as if she was a victim. Rather, she spent her time working, serving, worshipping, and giving back to her community.

Debbie was a better Catholic than a Mormon I'll ever be.

Debra Lee Marincic Adams
October 5, 1960 November 4, 2017

I have no doubt that she rests in peace.
November 14, 2017
I'm so sorry for your loss. Rest assured life is precious to our Creator. He promises to act in our behalf.
1 Corinthians 15:26
November 13, 2017
Debbie was a very upbeat, pleasant, and prayerful lady of quiet strength. Every time it seemed I was the last one remaining at Adoration in St. Vincent's Sanctuary, I'd turn and there Debbie would be in her wheelchair in center aisle. It was a joy to see her there! She always outlasted me - being the last one to leave. Debbie provided us a terrific example of how to truly embrace God's will in great love and equanimity. She will be greatly missed. May she rest in peace!!
November 11, 2017
Offering condolences to your family for the loss of your loved one. May God become a source of great comfort during this difficult time