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David Wells Morgan

David Wells Morgan

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December 26, 2014
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December 26, 2014
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February 11, 2013
Mr and Mrs Morgan, please accept my deepest sympathy. David was a fine and respected member of the Class of 1984 at Vanderbilt Law School. I was priveleged to be his classmate and friend. We all had the highest regard for David and will cherish fond memories of his kindness. He touched many lives and will be missed by all.
February 11, 2013
Dr. Morgan was the leader of our Versailles study abroad group in the Fall semester of my Sophomore year at Furman University. He allowed our group to see France as we had never dreamed before. We really experienced the cities, countryside and the culture thanks to him. He made us feel like a family. He graciously accepted my request to play the piano at my wedding, and did a fabulous job. I will always remember how he gave me a personal tour of Chartres cathedral. I feel like I've lost a brother. Our world will miss you, Dr. Morgan.
February 11, 2013
Lives pass before most people learn to look underneath the surface of things and personalities, beyond blonde hair, straight teeth, flashy cloths or sports car; beyond misguided interpretations. To David's intellectual and physical vision, superficial surfaces were as transparent as the panes in a kitchen window. And during the few weeks every summer when he and I would teach people to speak Latin at summer workshops, we'd take long walks – and David loved to walk – and discuss how the best teaching methods are often the opposite of what common sense seems to suggest. Almost ten years ago one of these walks was in the mountainous regions of southern Italy. As our feet slowly took us up a narrow road that snaked its way up a small summit, I shared a metaphor with David. And you need to understand, a well wrought metaphor was to David's ears and mind, what a excellent vintage is to a wine-connoisseur's palate. This turned out to be one of his favorites.
Our winding road was flanked by almond trees the entire two miles up. ''David,'' I said, ''what everybody says about life being a tree is preposterous. They say that our lives are like trees filled with leaves. As we grow older those leaves begin to fall. And that when a life ends, the leaves have all fallen and the tree withers away. But they've got it backwards,'' I explained. ''Indeed each human life is a tree. When we are born, the tree is as leafless as we are naked. As we grow and acquire knowledge, leaves begin to appear."
"Each accomplishment, new friend and good deed generates its leaf on our tree. The trees of our lives, if we cultivate friends, contribute to the beauty of this world and show kindness and respect to our fellow passengers on this small blue planet, they, these trees of us, will spread their branches, reach to the heavens and be filled with thousands of green leaves. And when we die, if we have lived well, our friends and family will find comfort and sweet memories in the shade of our trees and their thousands of leaves.'' I'm not surprised that David liked that metaphor more than any other. Though his modesty would never let him admit it, I suspect that down deep he intended to leave us all with a majestically elegant Carolina Pine filled with the leaves of life.
And I want Dan, David's brother, and Bill and Dorothy, his mother and father, to know that from an apartment in Stockholm, Sweden, my seven-year-old daughter Lovisa, 12 year-old son Axel and 16-year-old daughter Freja and my wife Maria have lost a friend; but I know that even from the snowy regions of Scandinavia, my family can see a towering Long Leaf Pine with its roots way down in the ancient soils of David's beloved Carolinas. David lives on within all of us.
And to his Latin speaking friends,
Luge´te, amici, luge´te medullitus hi^c. Nam funebri ha^c flebili poma^ deducta^ et ritibus solemniter actis, Nos Davidis memoria^ freti excitatique nostrum colloquendi morem nec non una^ conversandi melius et, inprimis, humanius collere poterimus. Ubi alii suis in provinciis zelotypia^ incensi et errores aliorum insectandi desiderio correpti neque amicitiam neque veram humanitatem collant, sequamur nos mores Davidis. Fruamur amicitia^ intima^ et ha^c nostra^ lingua^ communi utamur ad vitam iucundissime et urbanissime, ut ipse David solebet, agendam. Sit non modo Davidi terra levis, verum potius sit eius memoria, sit eius humanitas, sit erga omnes eius mirifica benignitas, sint haec omnia nobis exempla diligentissime observanda, perinde ac alto in mari nautis Stella illa Septentrionalis refulget.
February 10, 2013
David was entirely the embodiment of Intaminatis Fulget Honoribus that is Wofford. Even if I had his gift for language, or his sensitivity, his wit, his charm, and all talents of this great and humble man of parts, I could not express the loss. He will remain the young, gifted, undergraduate whose every word was music and whose musical talent, like all his talent, seemed to spring wihout effort. What a light in this world he has lit.
February 10, 2013
David taught a class on Proust at FULIR-Furman University Learning In Retirement-That was 12 years ago and that is when I knew he was a special human being, brilliant humble and kind. He even delivered sections of Proust's in the original French to my mailbox and to other's mailboxes. Last time I spoke to him, begging him to teach
some other French literature course at OLLI, he agreed to do Corneille and Racine. Alas, that will never be.
Mr. and Mrs. Morgan,your son was a wonderful man who touched many lives, young and old.May you find some comfort in feeling that your suffering is shared by so many
of us who knew him.
Natalina Ferlauto, Greenville SC
February 10, 2013
I wish the best for David's family, and for those he held close in these last years who were fortunate enough to call him friend. I knew David for many years from junior high through high school and beyond college graduation, and have many fond memories of him as he went through law school, held a position as an attorney, went back to school at Princeton, and beyond. He was not only intelligent, he had a wonderful sense of humor, and delighted in learning and sharing with others. God bless you David, always.
February 10, 2013
I am deeply grateful for the opportunity to speak yesterday at David's service, to hear the eloquent and heartfelt words of his friends, to honor his family, pray together, and celebrate his life. Here are my words:

For almost twenty five years now I have been trying to praise David Morgan, but unfailingly he forestalled my attempt. Now at last, he is not here to do so, but I would gladly trade singing his praises, were he here to deflect cheerfully once again my doing so.
I have loved David from the first moment we met, when we learned that we shared a love for music, literature ancient and modern, and God. In New York City, walking up and down and around the island of Manhattan and neighboring boroughs, we talked and laughed and dreamed: of hiking together through France and Spain on the trail of St. James, of making music together into our old age, of languages learned, of otium (leisure) spent together in retirement reading foreign languages together and, last but not least, of continuing our ongoing discussions, philosophical and theological, into old age.
I thank God that we were able to realize much of this, hiking together in France and Spain, making music together on countless occasions, and best of all carrying on our many conversations in mutual love and support. Wondrously, David became a beloved part of my family, loving Bernardine, my wife, and each of my children as if each were the only person on earth. David had more talents than we could possibly name – he was a genius, and if I had more time I could tell many humorous stories documenting that fact – but to my mind the best talent of them all was his saintly ability to devote his whole gracious attention and evident charity to each and every person he was with. I shall ever treasure my memories of David's walking around Greenville speaking Latin and French with Jack, of his teaching music composition to Tess, of his reading aloud to Peter, of his gracious charm praising Nia's Parisian French to locals in Southwestern France, and last but not least discussing literature with my Bernardine.
I must also praise here his parents and family, whom David spoke to me about constantly ever since I met him. It was indeed a great privilege and blessing to be with you all, Mr. and Mrs. Morgan and Dan, throughout last weekend; it was an especially great privilege and blessing to be able to pray with you and David. Know that you all and David will be ever in our prayers. It was also beautiful, when he reminded me last Saturday that it was through your prayers that he landed his dream job at Furman back in 1995, where he flourished in so many ways. He has never ceased marveling about the talents and goodness of his many colleagues and friends and students at Furman, and we shall always treasure the stories he shared with us about them.
St. Augustine, whom David and I read and loved together for decades, was surely right in saying that to die young is a great blessing. I understand that. Nevertheless, it is fitting to grieve the loss of such a beautiful man and such a dear friend.
Please excuse my addressing a few words in Latin to David directly:
Maturius aequo nos reliquisti, amice carissime. Mox tamen, ut credo, quia tempus ineluctabile fugit in aeternum, te iterum videre poterimus. Periucundum erit mihi meisque apud patris domum te revisere.
February 09, 2013
I remember listening to far-off broadcasts from Havana and Moscow in David's house when we were kids (and reading way-cool and forbidden communist propaganda leaflets they sent him when they realized he was listening in). How odd and other-worldly that seemed, and how cool to have a friend — just another neighborhood kid — who could actually explain how vacuum tube radios worked! God rest you, Mr. David. I wonder if you ever knew how many lives you touched?
February 09, 2013
To the family of David Morgan: I pray for Grace and Strength of God over your family as you go through this time of grief. As a former student of his, I can say that you can indeed be very proud of your son. He was a brilliant man, but such a GOOD man too. He always treated his students with great respect and encouraged them to overcome their difficulties in their studies. He will be so very missed.
February 09, 2013
Merci, cher professeur. May your family and friends find peace in knowing he touched so many with his enthusiasm and love of learning and teaching. You are in my prayers.
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