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May 03, 2015

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May 03, 2015

Please don't submit copyrighted work; original poems, songs or prayers welcomed. Legacy.com reviews all Guest Book entries to ensure appropriate content. Our staff does not correct grammar or spelling.

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Resources
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Clark Pages (100+)
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Clark Mentions
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Helpful Services
October 29, 2006
to the remberance of Laurel Clark
i would like to send my deepest sympathy to her family
god bless all cosmonauts and the nasa as well
January 27, 2005
sorry for your loss.
February 22, 2004
This story about Laurel Clark caught my attention;

At a reception for astronauts the night before liftoff, a 9-year-old girl, the daughter of a friend, walked up to Laurel Clark and handed her a poem.

Its first line was: "The angel who fell to earth."

Laurel and her husband, Jon, exchanged a glance.

"I said, 'Wow. I wonder what that means,' " Jon Clark recalled. " 'I hope it doesn't mean what I think it does.' "

Though they didn't discuss it that night, the couple had talked before about the risks of space travel. Laurel was not a reckless person, but for her, risk and aliveness was the same thing. She had been a sky diver, a ship's doctor in a submarine and a scuba diver who trained with Navy SEALs.

When he went to pick up belongings Laurel Clark had left in a duffel bag at Kennedy Space Center, the "angel" poem, tucked in a pocket among her clothes, was the first thing Jon Clark found.

He searched in vain for a picture she must have taken up with her on the flight. It showed the two of them in a sailboat. It was one of her favorite photos of the two of them together. They had taken it years before. On the back, she had written:

"A ship in a harbor is safe. But that's not what ships are for."
February 18, 2003
To the family of Laurel Clark:

Our prayers and thoughts are with her family though this diffuclt time.
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