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Seth Williamson

Seth Williamson

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May 24, 2015
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Preview Entry
May 24, 2015
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Please don't submit copyrighted work; original poems, songs or prayers welcomed.

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October 10, 2011
I don't remember exactly how Seth contacted me, but it was back in the mid 90's when he asked me to teach his daughter trombone. I invited them to my home and Seth would sit in my dining room and listen as I instructed Emily. One evening he shared with me his frustrations with playing the trumpet. He said he had played since HS but never felt it sounded good. I told him to bring his horn the next time he came and I'd listen to see if I could help. When I listened to him I couldn't believe the amount of air he was putting through those pipes. I told him the simple answer was that he just had too much to offer the trumpet and needed a larger bore instrument. He refused the idea of the tuba. I happened to have an old euphonium in my basement and gave it to him to take home. Well, obviously he fell in love and couldn't put it down. Before I knew it he had bought himself one of the nicest horns I've seen and was playing in a community band. We talked occassionally and he shared his love of the instrument, the repertoire for the horn, and the concert band music. At one point I told him jokingly that he wasn't a real euphonium player until he learned to play in bass clef. After laughing about my crazy idea he agreed to try to learn it, so off and on we'd get together in my band room and work on a couple of duets, but his heart was not in it and we both decided it wasn't important. He just loved that euphonium so much he didn't want anything to slow him down. Last year he called me and asked me to come to the studio to take a look at a new horn he was thinking about buying, a valve trombone. "Seth, you know no self respecting trombone player would touch one of those, "I said. "But this is really cool and I think I want to buy it." We had a discussion about how most valve trombones had terrible intonation problems, yadda, yadda, yadda.......he wasn't listening. We had a great time putting it through a few intonation tests and it wouldn't have mattered what I said,(although it sounded nice) he was in love again and he bought it, too. The week before he died he asked me to come sit in with the Sauerkraut band as I had on another occassion. I'm so sorry I'll never have the opportunity to do that. His voice, his love of music, his passion for so many things in life were genuinely special to all who knew him. Whether listening to him on WVTF or sitting down with him with our horns, I'll miss his passion for music. May we honor his memory by keeping his family and friends in our prayers at this time.
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