"If I arrived at the pearly gates and Saint Peter said, 'What have you done to deserve entry?' I'd just say, 'Did you see my Lena Horne story?'"

During his illustrious career, television journalist Ed Bradley took home 19 Emmys and won numerous other awards such as the Peabody and the Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award – and for good reason.

Bradley – the first African-American television correspondent to cover the White House – is best remembered for his 26 years on CBS news magazine "60 Minutes," where he was adept at all kinds of news reporting and covered big issues such as war and politics, incisively examined topics such as AIDS in Africa, and brought us lighter fare from entertainment and sports.

Bradley could do it all, but perhaps most enduring are his interviews with celebrities from all points of the spectrum, from King of Pop Michael Jackson to comedy legend George Burns to Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh.

One of Bradley's proudest moments was his interview with Lena Horne. Reminiscing about the piece, he said, "If I arrived at the pearly gates and Saint Peter said, 'What have you done to deserve entry?' I'd just say, 'Did you see my Lena Horne story?'"

Bradley shared some lighter moments with Tiger Woods, discussing Woods' love not just for winning but for kicking butt.

A few months after his death, Bradley was honored with a jazz funeral at the New Orleans Jazz Fest – a fitting tribute to the longtime host of NPR's "Jazz at Lincoln Center" and an honor worthy of a man noted for the rich, vibrant quality of his work and life.