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Remembering Amy Winehouse

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Rock Goddess Gone Too Soon

The music world was saddened by the sudden death of Amy Winehouse on Saturday. Born in London on 14 September 1983, Winehouse grew up loving jazz and singing whenever she had a chance – to the point that she often disrupted grade school classes with her singing (probably more to the delight of her classmates than her teachers). By age 9 she was studying at the Susi Earnshaw Theatre School, and by 10 she had formed her first band, a rap group called Sweet ‘n’ Sour. At 13 she had her first guitar, and she soon began writing her own songs.

Winehouse achieved success in her native land with her debut album, 2003’s Frank. Its jazzy tones, powerhouse vocals and original lyrics gained critical acclaim and won several awards. International fame was soon to follow when she released Back to Black in 2006. On her second release, Winehouse strayed from the jazz sound of Frank in favor of an eclectic homage to 1960s soul – particularly girl groups – and contemporary R&B. Lead single “Rehab” catapulted Winehouse to the top of the charts and was named the best song of 2007 by Time magazine and won three Grammy awards in 2008, including Song of the Year. The follow-up singles didn’t disappoint. By 2008, Winehouse had begun to formulate new projects and talk about a third album, but other than a few songs contributed to compilation albums, more music wasn’t to be.

It wasn’t just Winehouse’s music that attracted attention. Her style excited fans, centering on vintage dresses and the iconic beehive hairdo. And her notorious lifestyle was much covered in the press. But rather than focus on the troubled life of a phenomenon who died too young, we’d rather let Winehouse’s music speak for her. Here’s just a small sample of her marvelous discography.