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Remembering NPR's Margot Adler

Wikimedia Commons / Kyle Cassidy

Remembering NPR's Margot Adler

Margot Adler (1946 - 2014) reported the news many of us would otherwise miss.

The veteran NPR journalist’s main beat was New York City, but her reports covered all corners of American life in her decades on the air. She also was an accomplished author, writing on neo-paganism, of which she was a proud practitioner and advocate, as well as our culture's obsession with vampires. Fans of Adler say her voice and unique point of view will be missed.

See how her colleagues remember her and listen to some of her reports.

Margot Adler: Pioneering Pagan Activist, NPR Journalist Margot Adler, an iconic NPR correspondent and Wiccan priestess, died Monday, July 28, of endometrial cancer at 68. Over the decades, she developed her voice as a journalist who covered far-reaching corners of American life while maintaining a personal commitment to paganism and nature spirituality. Read more

Margot Adler joined NPR in 1979. She was known for a personality as dynamic as the city she covered: New York. She died Monday at age 68 of cancer. NPR remembers her in this segment. Read more

Margot Adler on Being Wiccan and NPR Discrimination Adler's NPR career was just beginning in 1979 when she published her book, "Drawing Down the Moon," an exploration of the Pagan community of which she was a member. When she died, she left a long legacy as a reporter, and as an outspoken Wiccan. Read more

Interview June 17, 2013: Adler reflects on her years in the journalism business and the future of New York City. Read transcript and listen to interview

Discovering A Family Member's Lost Time In Amsterdam Adler tells the story of one of her cousins who hid from the Nazis in Amsterdam, just like Anne Frank, in this story from May 21, 2013. Read and listen

Margot Adler on Vampires Adler turned her discerning eye to our culture's obsession with vampires and came to some unexpected conclusions. Listen here

A Beer Backlash To LGBT Exclusion In St. Patrick's Parades Beer makers Guinness and Sam Adams withdrew sponsorship from New York and Boston's St. Patrick Day parades, respectively, over the exclusion of openly gay, lesbian and transgender participants. Margot Adler examines the reasons why in this piece from March 17, 2014. Read more

Margot Adler archive at NPR