Search Obituaries
Legends & Legacies View More

Art Linkletter Said the Darndest Things

Published: 7/17/2012
Art Linkletter was one of the all-time greatest interviewers… but don't lump him in with serious folks like Tim Russert or Barbara Walters. His interviews weren't intended to dig deep into the political world, elicit insight and a tear, or anything else quite so lofty. Linkletter interviewed folks with the primary goal of making us laugh.

 In this April 5, 1962 file photo, TV personality Art Linkletter talks with 4-year-old Ronnie Glahn shows Art Linkletter his idea of how bad guys look, on Art's TV show in Hollywood, April 5, 1962 in Los Angeles. Linkletter, who hosted the popular TV shows
In this April 5, 1962 file photo, TV personality Art Linkletter talks with 4-year-old Ronnie Glahn shows Art Linkletter his idea of how bad guys look, on Art's TV show in Hollywood, April 5, 1962 in Los Angeles. Linkletter, who hosted the popular TV shows "People Are Funny" and "House Party" in the 1950s and 1960s, died Wednesday, May 26, 2010 at his home in the Bel-Air section of Los Angeles. He was 97. (AP Photo/David F. Smith, file)


Linkletter would have turned 100 today. He died just two years ago after what was clearly a wonderful life (as Linkletter himself asserted): he had a successful writing career, enjoyed a happy marriage that lasted almost 75 years, and was the host of two long-running and popular TV and radio shows. Those shows had casual formats that gave Linkletter plenty of room to chat with his guests, ad lib… and look for the laughs.

It all started with People Are Funny, which began on radio in 1942 and moved to TV in 1954, running through 1960. On it, Linkletter presented a variety of stunts, games and contests, often employing audience participation – and with impressive prizes.



Just a few years after People Are Funny's debut, Linkletter brought a second program to radio: House Party. The radio program debuted in 1947 and continued on both radio and TV for decades. Once again, it offered audience participation and a wide variety of content, from household hints to quizzes to celebrity visits – like this chat with Lucille Ball that led to a very funny skit.



One of the most popular segments on House Party was Linkletter's interviews with children, which came to be called "Kids Say the Darndest Things." Linkletter would ask children questions, and their responses kept the audience in stitches. The segment was such a hit that Linkletter published several books based on it, and it later became its own TV show, with Bill Cosby as host.



Written by Linnea Crowther

Related Topics
Our Picks
Legacy.com and its newspaper affiliates publish obituaries for approximately 75 percent of people who die in the U.S. – updated continuously throughout each day – as well as government records for all U.S. deaths. Find an obituary, sign a Guest Book or build an interactive memorial. Get directions to a funeral home, order flowers or donate to charity. Read advice from experts or participate in online discussions. Thanks for visiting Legacy.com – Where life stories live on. We welcome your feedback.