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The Nixons: A Love Story

Published: 3/15/2012

Pat Nixon would have turned 100 years old tomorrow, and the Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum has prepared an exhibit to remember and celebrate the former First Lady. One important – and previously, often overlooked – part of her life was her enduring love affair with her husband. The exhibit showcases that love with a collection of never-before-seen love letters from Richard to Pat.

“Somehow on Tuesday there was something electric in the usually almost stifling air in Whittier. An Irish gypsy who radiates all that is happy and beautiful was there. She left behind her a note addressed to a struggling barrister who looks from a window and dreams. And in that note he found sunshine and flowers, and a great spirit which only great ladies can inspire. Someday let me see you again? In September? Maybe?”
 

 In this June 5, 1960 file photo, former President Richard Nixon, left, and his wife Pat pose for photos while campaigning at Rockefeller Center in New York. Six love letters between the 37th president and his wife will go on display Friday, March 16, 2012 as part of an exhibit at the Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum. The exhibit is intended to celebrate what would have been Pat Nixon’s 100th birthday and is dedicated to her life and accomplishments. (AP File Photo)

In this June 5, 1960 file photo, former President Richard Nixon, left, and his wife Pat pose for photos while campaigning at Rockefeller Center in New York. Six love letters between the 37th president and his wife will go on display Friday, March 16, 2012 as part of an exhibit at the Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum. The exhibit is intended to celebrate what would have been Pat Nixon’s 100th birthday and is dedicated to her life and accomplishments. (AP File Photo)

 

 

Pat Nixon was a working woman in her mid-20s when she met the future president, and she didn't fall in love with him quite as easily as he did with her. They met while acting together in a community theater, and on their first date Richard asked Pat to marry him. She later reflected, "I thought he was nuts or something!" Richard wasn't prepared to give in, and he courted her for two years while gaining her friendship – he even drove her on dates with other men. As time went on, Pat was wooed by his drive and ambition… and his sense of fun. "Oh but you just don’t realize how much fun he is! He’s just so much fun," she once said. Eventually, she was won over, and in 1940 they married.

"Every day and every night I want to see you and be with you. Yet I have no feeling of selfish ownership or jealousy. Let's go for a long ride Sunday; let's go to the mountains weekends; let's read books in front of fires; most of all, let's really grow together and find the happiness we know is ours."
 

 

 

 In this Aug. 9, 1974 black-and-white file photo, President Richard M. Nixon and his wife Pat Nixon are shown standing together in the East Room of the White House in Washington. Thirty-six years after Nixon testified secretly to a grand jury investigating Watergate, a federal judge orders the first public release of the transcript. (AP Photo/Charlie Harrity, File)

In this Aug. 9, 1974 black-and-white file photo, President Richard M. Nixon and his wife Pat Nixon are shown standing together in the East Room of the White House in Washington. Thirty-six years after Nixon testified secretly to a grand jury investigating Watergate, a federal judge orders the first public release of the transcript. (AP Photo/Charlie Harrity, File)

 

 

The Nixons' love didn't wane as the years wore on – indeed, it was as strong as ever when they moved into the White House, when Pat stood by Richard as he resigned his presidency, and until Pat's death, less than a year before Richard's. Richard's unabashed tears at his wife's funeral were a testament to the deep love that lasted a lifetime.

The president, often very serious in the public eye, lit up when speaking of his beloved:
 

 

 

 

 

Only a few of the love letters have been released in anticipation of the exhibit, but we look forward to reading more of this presidential love story.

Written by Linnea Crowther
 

 

 

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