Holly MORRIS

Obituary
  • "Aunt Holly was bright and beautiful. Her smile lit up the..."
    - Lynda
  • "My thoughts and prayers are with you in your time of grief...."
    - ~ Rev. 21:4 ~ ~ V Austin
  • "Sorry for your loss."
    - Erin Swift Libby
  • "A strong and funny woman! She will be missed."
    - Mickey Gillmor
  • "Aunt Holly was always so loving and supportive. She..."
    - Genevieve Moscovitz

MORRIS, Holly June 16, 1942 - June 30, 2014 Holly Morris, 72, a reporter for Newsweek magazine, The Washington Post, and feature writer for the Atlanta Journal Constitution passed away on June 30th in the loving embrace of her family. After graduating from the Columbia School of Journalism she took a job as a researcher for Newsweek magazine where, as Holly Camp, she was one of forty-six female Newsweek staffers to file and win an historic gender discrimination lawsuit against the magazine. Together they struck a decisive blow cracking the glass ceiling of the systemic promotion of male writers and editors over their highly qualified female colleagues. It was the first class action lawsuit brought by female journalists and accounted for the transformed workplaces via successive discrimination lawsuits at The New York Times, CBS, and Time magazine, amongst others. Holly became a reporter and was sent to the Atlanta bureau of Newsweek Magazine in 1976, subsequently joining the Washington Post and the Atlanta Journal Constitution in the late nineteen eighties. In her career as a reporter, she covered stories across the entire southeast, ranging from the arrival and recuperative treatment of the gorilla known as Willie B. at Zoo Atlanta, to the LBGT community and it's fight against discrimination in the wake of the Mathew Shepard killing in the early nineties. It was her own story, her prodigious bout with breast cancer, that brought her out from behind her byline. From her front page story series picture with the banner that read "My Only Option" she led us, procedure by procedure, feeling by feeling, through her fight to stave off a 20% over five year survival rate offered by traditional chemotherapy, by undergoing an excruciating experimental treatment consisting of bone marrow transplant, stem cell replacement, radiation, and chemotherapy pioneered by Duke University. Her cancer never did reoccur, but she suffered progressive dementia, which, seventeen years later, proved terminal. Holly will be most remembered for her indomitable optimism, courageous good humor, and warm and loving grace. She is survived by her father John G. Morris, former photo editor of Life magazine and The New York Times, her son Gabriel Moscovitz, Atlanta filmmaker, her daughter Talia Moscovitz, Photography curator, brother Christopher Morris, writer, brother John Morris, architect, and former husband David Moscovitz. Memorial to be held at the Atlanta Friends Meeting, Saturday July 26, 2pm. All are welcome to join the family in celebrating the life of the remarkable Holly Morris.
Published in The Atlanta Journal-Constitution on July 23, 2014
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