Coretta Scott King

Obituary
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  • "A well respected and dignified figure in the community and..."
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  • "think you if it was not for you we would be slave"
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  • "Rip Mrs.king"
    - Dalantae Hicks

KING-Coretta Scott. The staff and members of our 275,000-member health care union mourn the passing of beloved friend and ally Coretta Scott King. She was an inspiring champion of racial and economic justice, peace and the rights of working women. She was a lifelong foe of racism, poverty and violence. She lived a life of strength, grace, principle, sacrifice and beauty. Mrs. King first met 1199ers through her husband, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s close association with our union. After his tragic death in 1968 she became a regular at 1199 rallies, picketlines and cultural events. Members from Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore to Hahneman Hospital in Philadelphia to St. Luke's Hospital in Manhattan remember meeting her at rallies outside their workplaces. At 1199 conventions and Black History month celebrations she repeatedly called for justice for working mothers. But her most enduring association with 1199 hospital workers came in 1969 during the 100-day strike of 400 black women at two Charleston, South Carolina hospitals. Mrs. King marched, led prayer vigils, spoke in churches and buoyed the spirits of Charleston strikers in an inspiring display of leadership that fused soul power and union power. Over the years her quiet and eloquent dignity overcame bombs, bullets and tragic loss in her ongoing quest to realize the shared dream of a beloved community. Dennis Rivera, President George Gresham, Secretary-Treasurer, 1199SEIU United Healthcare Workers East
Published in The New York Times on Feb. 2, 2006
bullet 1960s bullet Civil Rights
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