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Marjorie Rae Henry

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Marjorie Rae Henry

Marjorie Rae Henry passed away in Seattle on October 22, 2013, at the age of 90 from complications of a stroke. Marjorie was born in New York City on March 24, 1923, to Alexander and Lee Karlin. She was the youngest of three children.

She was preceded in death by her husband, James W. Henry, Jr., her brother, Jules Karlin, and her sister, Ruth Ford. Surviving Marjorie are her three daughters, Elizabeth "Betsy" Klampert of Ossining, New York, and her children Amanda and Andrew; Julia Anne Henry of Seattle; and Alexandra Simons of Houston.

Marjorie was a graduate of Long Beach High School (New York), the University of Montana (Missoula), and the University of Washington (Seattle). She attended Black Mountain College (North Carolina) before attending the University of Montana where she met her husband. After earning her Masters in Library Science from the University of Washington in 1968, she worked for the Seattle Public Library as a reference librarian, specializing in maps and becoming the Map Librarian before retiring in 1988.

In addition to her professional career, Marjorie was a lifelong political activist on behalf of the Democratic Party. She was also, for many years, on the board of the King County South League of Women Voters. She also served for a number of years on the Seattle Art Museum Auxiliary.

Marjorie was learned and witty, with a keen intellect. She loved music, especially jazz, was a terrific dancer, and was always beautifully dressed. She was a lover of the arts with a dedication to the theater and was a discriminating movie fan. She was also a passionate and inventive cook, making the most delectable lemon meringue pies among other delights, and, at Christmas, supplied her family and friends with delicious cookies. She loved her family and had a gift for making friends.

Her family and friends mourn her passing and will miss her greatly.
Published in The Seattle Times on Oct. 27, 2013
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