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Ronald Garman


1937 - 2015 Notice Condolences Gallery
Ronald Garman Notice


IN MEMORIAM RONALD JAMES GARMAN, a retired Bell System engineer, pilot for Capital Airlines, Naval Flight Engineer, umpire and videographer passed away on April 23, 2015 from leukemia. Ron was born in Baltimore on November 17, 1937 to Samuel and Margaret (Peggy) Garman. He was raised and attended school in Baltimore. He was an altar boy at Our Saviour Lutheran Church in Lansdowne. In 1954 at the age of 17 he joined the Navy Reserves and became a Naval Aerial photographer. He later became a Flight Engineer on the Navy's Lockheed Electra anti-submarine aircraft and a Chief Petty Officer, flying out of Naval Air Station Patuxent River. He was called into active duty during the Cuban Missile Crisis. In 1964 the P2V Neptune he was flying in caught fire and crashed into the Pacific Ocean during a training mission. Everyone survived, but Ron's injuries were so severe that he was told he didn't qualify, physically, to fly as a combat aircrew member any longer. Ron went all out to get himself qualified to return as an air crewman once more and was the only crew member from the accident to continue flying. Ron traveled the world and experienced many adventures with Anti-submarine Patrol Squadron VP-68 during his 40 years in the Navy. He made many life-long friends and attended numerous naval reunions after retirement. Ron started his other career in 1957 as a Western Electric equipment installer for The Bell System's central offices, working his way up to a Senior Engineer before retiring from Verizon in 1998. He earned a Bachelor of Science degree in accounting from the University of Maryland in 1974. Ron continued his education, taking classes and learning on his own, everything he could about video production. He owned two businesses, Columbia Studio Productions and Blackhawk Studios. He wrote, directed and produced a fictional story for Comcast television. Magic or Reality told the story of how anyone can be one step from homelessness. Military and civilian videos were produced by his companies. After retiring from the Navy and Verizon, Ron went on to become a pilot for Capital Airlines, flying cargo shipments to South and Central America. For all of his life, Ron played or umpired baseball and softball. Most recently, up until October of 2014, he umpired at Ripken Stadium in Harford County and for recreational centers throughout Howard County. Community sports and working with young people were huge joys for Ron. Ron had many interests and pursued all of them with gusto. He got great reviews for his acting in a play at the Arena Theatre in Washington DC in the early 60s. He studied and performed magic for orphanages and nursing homes in Europe while traveling with the Navy. He loved motorcycles and owned a 1947 knucklehead Harley Davidson in the 1950s. He rode a 2005 full dresser Harley Davidson in the 2000s. He loved 50s and 60s rock music, jazz and dancing. He loved to write fiction and had a few novels in the works. In his later years he was teaching himself to play drums. Ron was an avid collector of 1950s and motorcycle memorabilia, marbles, old coins and items from his travels. A colorful and fun loving man, he is missed by all that knew and loved him. Ron left his body to the Maryland State Anatomy Board. A memorial service and party will be held on November 22 at the V.F.W. Memorial Post 8097, 7209 Montevideo Rd, Jessup. Those wishing to make a donation in his memory can do so to the Wounded Warrior Project. Ron is survived by his wife, Vicki Hay of Fallston, daughters Kimberly Garman and Lisa Garman Pittman, son-in-law Timothy Pittman, all of Baltimore, sister Judy Unger, of Lincolnton, NC, sister Nancy Razzano and brother-in-law Joe Razzano of Reading, PA and many nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his parents, second wife Patricia Garman, brother Jeffrey Garman and brother Jack Garman.
Published in Baltimore Sun on Oct. 29, 2015
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