Barbara Kirby

Obituary
4 entries
  • "Dear Lynn, I'm so sad to just now find out about your mom...."
  • "I worked with Mrs. Kirby at Temple-Inland, she was a very..."
    - Doris Brooks Cooper
  • "with deepest sympathy in your time of loss"
    - debbie hollyfield
  • "I did not know her, but wish I had. Kathy Perrio"
    - Kathy Perrio
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1928 - 2015 Barbara Delaughder Kirby passed away after a long illness. Funeral services will be Monday, September 20th at the First United Methodist Church in Silsbee. She is preceded in death by her husband, Glen Kirby, son Joe Kirby, and grandson Jake Kirby. She is survived by her son Dr. Jim Kirby and wife Mary; daughter Lynn Droddy and husband Clint and daughter-in-law Pat Hardy; grandchildren Joe Kirby and wife Bridget and their son Kanon; Worley Coco and husband Tyler and their son Wyatt; Taylor Droddy, Matt Kirby, Sam Droddy and Nate Kirby. Barbara was born November 7, 1928 in Newkirk, Oklahoma. She was the youngest girl of six siblings, all of whom preceded her in death. Barbara was a vivacious young woman who excelled with modesty. She was high school Valedictorian, homecoming queen, first in state for flute, and star of her high school plays. After WWII, Barbara married handsome young attorney, Glen Kirby. Glen's career took them first to Midland, and then on to Dallas, Jasper, and finally Silsbee where they raised their three children. Barbara immersed herself in her community. In Silsbee, she participated in the Silsbee Women's Club, Silsbee Literary Club, and many bridge clubs. She relished acting in annual productions at the Silsbee Little Theater, embodying the persona of Betty White in Golden Girls. There she found an outlet for her wit and creativity. In one production, her children enjoyed seeing their mother roll across the stage, shouting the line I'm on fire with desire! She had an active church life at The First United Methodist Church participating in the choir, the Victory Sunday School class, the Church Council, the Stephen's Ministry, and many other leadership roles. Barbara cherished being mother and grandmother. She provided a home life filled with holiday celebrations, elaborate meals, games, and family traditions. Barbara took time with each individual. She took time to teach her children and grandchildren the little things, like how to make homemade ice cream and play card games, how to skate and make change with monopoly money. Barbara boldly endured the many mischievous adventures of her children with grace and humor, especially her two boy's troublemaking. Barbara created a cherished annual Christmas tradition for each of her grandchildren, in which they would visit stores to make a Christmas list and then go out for their own special dinner. She gave her undivided attention, her time, and her opinion - all under the umbrella of her wonderful humor and sharp wit. Barbara had a rich work life at Temple Inland. She worked as the president's secretary, before moving into the sales department. Her coworkers called her a force to be reckoned with, whose heels clicked down the hallways at high speed. She enjoyed playing bridge with the company's executives each day at lunch. After retirement, she enjoyed extensive travels with Glen and her many groups of friends. She travelled throughout Europe, saw glaciers in Alaska, and visited the East Coast to see the fall foliage. On the West Coast she saw Yellowstone and landscapes from Louis Lamoure's fiction. She loved spending time at their beach home and hosting gatherings for her many groups of friends there. When we remember Barbara, we will remember her starting conversations with I'm so grateful, and ending with her refrain of I can't complain. Her life is an example of one lived under the guiding sense of hard work, humor, duty and gratitude. She did not talk about these things, she just did them. She taught by example. We will miss her so.

Published in The Beaumont Enterprise from Sept. 20 to Sept. 21, 2015
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