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PAUL C. MARTIN

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PAUL C. MARTIN Obituary
MARTIN, Paul C. Physicist and former Dean of Harvard University's Division of Applied Sciences, died at home on Sunday, June 19, 2016 at 85 after a long illness with Parkinson's Disease. He was born in New York City and is survived by his wife of 59 years, Ann (Bradley) Martin. He also is survived by his brother Robert and sister-in-law Judith Martin of Washington, DC, son Peter Martin, daughter Stephanie Martin Glennon, son Daniel Martin and daughter-in-law Laurel Pescosolido Martin, and nine grandchildren: Samuel, Noah, Emma, and Suzannah Glennon; Eliot, Elise, and Alex Martin; and Linnea and Davin Martin. He was predeceased by his son-in-law, Dr. James Glennon. By the age of 23, Dr. Martin had earned both an undergraduate degree and a Ph.D in Physics from Harvard University, where at the age of 26 he began teaching Physics. His tenure at Harvard included more six decades of research in theoretical physics, including chaos and turbulence, atomic, and condensed matter physics. He became Chairman of the Physics Department, and in 1977 began more than two decades as Dean of the Division of Applied Sciences, later known as the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. In 1982 he was appointed the first Van Vleck Professor of Physics. Dean Harry Lewis noted Dr. Martin's devotion to every detail of his academic and administrative work: "He did things himself, to make sure everything was done right—every logical flaw was rooted out, every word was written properly, and every argument and viewpoint was taken into account and either incorporated or countered. And yet he was kind and supportive to those of us who couldn't keep up with him." In lieu of flowers, donations in Dr. Martin's memory may be made to the Union of Concerned Scientists, 2 Brattle Square, Cambridge, MA 02138-3780. Details of a fall memorial service in Cambridge will follow.
Published in The Boston Globe on June 25, 2016
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