Dr. Cliff A. Jones Jr.

Obituary
  • "Clif got me through the aftermath of my husband's death..."
    - Cynthia Sample
  • "Dear Mardi, Trip and Robin, I will always remember Cliff..."
  • "Cliff was a good friend to me, both in the church in which..."
    - D. A. Sharpe

Jones Jr., Dr. Cliff A. Age 94, pioneer Dallas clinical psychologist and longtime resident of University Park, died of natural causes on March 29, 2014. Dr. Jones moved through five careers. He was journalist for the Greenville Evening Banner and the Dallas Times Herald. He served as a Marine Corps officer with the final rank of Lieutenant Colonel in WWII. He and his father ran a wholesale fur business in Dallas under the label JonClif furs and Cliff was a furrier and fur buyer for John Wanamaker, New York. After starting a family, he became a clinical psychologist with a Meadows Building office for 39 years. In later years he was an independent pine tree farmer near Mineola, Texas. Cliff was born September 14, 1919, in Greenville, Texas and was a graduate of Greenville High School, held BA and MA degrees from S.M.U., and a Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley. He completed a postdoctoral fellowship in the Psychiatry Department, University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Dallas. He spent almost all of his war years in the Pacific theatre. He helped strengthen military defenses on American Samoa and then joined the Second Marine Division for the Tarawa campaign. He became commander of the Marine detachment on the new heavy cruiser Chicago and was among early troops to go ashore in Japan. He liked to boast that he was the first American after the war to spend the night on top of Mt. Fuji. His serious Christian pilgrimage developed during his post-war years at Berkeley. Before arriving there, his interest in Christ led to his memorizing the Sermon on the Mount. His faith deepened as he struggled with the contrast between Christ's lofty teachings and the secular environment of a large state university. He was left feeling grateful, however, for the challenge he found in fellow students and professors who often differed with him and seemed more interested in rigorous scientific research than human service. Dr. Jones was organizing chair of the Dallas Suicide and Crisis Center. He had a long interest in Parents as Teachers, a program for new babies and their parents, sponsored in Texas by the Mental Health Association of Texas. He was a Texas leader in development of psychology as an independent profession. He served as President of the Dallas Society of clinical Psychologists and in 1986 was President of the Texas Psychology Association. He and his colleague, Dr. Peggy Ladenberger, wrote a weekly Parenting column for the Dallas Morning News in the late 70's. For some fifty years Cliff served as an elder at Highland Park Presbyterian Church, was long active in the national church's higher courts, and was commissioner to three General Assemblies. To his family he was known as Pop, a gentle spirited man with great wisdom and insight. His love for all members of his family was evident, and his sense of humor contagious. He is survived by his wife of almost 65 years, Mardi Bryant Jones; two children, Trip Jones of Dallas and Robin Jones McGowan; son-in-law, Bill McGowan; three grand-daughters, Heather McGowan and future grand son-in-law, Eric Anderson, Bridget Sommerlatte and husband, Neil, and Summer Peppler and husband, Kyle; nieces, Jeanne Rumley and Ellen Beauchamp and nephews, Bill Beard and Dr. Charles Beard. In addition, the Bryant clan in Wisconsin were always close to his heart. A Celebration of Cliff's amazing life will be held at 3:30 pm on Monday, May 5, at Highland Park Presbyterian Church. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Suicide and Crisis Center of North Texas, 2802 Swiss Avenue, Dallas 75204.

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Funeral Home
Restland Funeral Home
13005 Greenville Avenue Dallas, TX 75243
(972) 238-7111
Funeral Home Details
Published in Dallas Morning News from Apr. 4 to Apr. 5, 2014
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