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Dr. Clarence Jackson Brooks(1950 - 2013)

Dr. Clarence Jackson Brooks, a prominent Fort Worth physician, passed away peacefully in his sleep Saturday, Aug. 10, 2013, with his loving and devoted wife, Sonya, near his side, and enveloped in the jazz music he enjoyed, in the comfort of their home. Funeral: 10 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 17, at Great Commission Baptist Church, 7700 McCart Ave., the Rev. Douglas E. Brown, host pastor. Visitation: Noon to 9 p.m. Friday at Morris-Bates Mortuary. Wake/reception: 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Friday at Brooks Family Practice Clinic, 2200 Evans Ave. "Dr. Clarence," as he was lovingly called by his many patients, made his mission in life to always be a compassionate physician, and to provide the most comprehensive medical treatment in Fort Worth. His practice served a diverse population, which began and grew through the graces of the black community. Later, many patients of Tarrant County, whether economically disadvantaged or not, came to seek his medical knowledge and care due to his reputation as an accepting and loving physician. The broad smiles and laughter of his patients after their visits to the Brooks Family Practice Clinic are true testaments of his total devotion to his profession. This legacy of service spans over 61 years, and two generations, beginning with his father, Dr. Marion "Jack" Brooks. The fourth child of Marion and Marie Brooks, Dr. Clarence was born Oct. 22, 1950, while his father was in medical school at Howard University. Dr. Clarence knew early in life that he was destined to be a physician and that he was destined to serve humanity. At the age of 14, he worked in the family clinic cleaning the offices. He eventually was promoted from janitor to a desk position, which he held until he went off to college. He graduated from Howard University College of Medicine in 1975, at the age of 24, making him the youngest member of his graduating class. Upon his graduation, Dr. Clarence immediately returned to Fort Worth and joined his father in the practice of medicine at the Brooks Clinic. His patient load included treating an average of 30 patients a day in his office, while also serving as the medical director of two nursing homes and delivering babies. In 1976, he was named president of the Texas Sickle Cell Anemia Association of Texas, and traveled throughout the state, educating communities on the disease and the benefits of being tested. He believed in giving back to the community through donations to many causes, including Sickle Cell Anemia Association of Texas, American Heart Association and Howard University. He assisted many young people in realizing their passions in professions, including medicine, music and art. He believed that his medical degree was a resource provided to him by the community, and it was his love of the community that consistently drove him to give back. For over 30 years, Dr. Clarence had an open-door policy regarding young athletes and school physicals. He was a favorite with high school students for providing nearly free athletic physicals. He believed that cost should not be a barrier to young athletes and their ability to join a school sports team. Dr. Clarence was a member of the Tarrant County Medical Society, Alpha Phi Alpha Inc. and Morningside United Methodist Church. Survivors: Left to cherish his precious memories are his loving and devoted wife, Sonya H. Brooks; daughters by a previous marriage, Leigh Brooks-Butler (Christopher) and Codie Brooks; grandsons, Caleb and Gavin Butler; brother, Commissioner Roy Charles Brooks (Dr. Jennifer); sisters, Marian Bryant (Dr. Bill, deceased), Carol Brooks and Marie Anne Washington (Dr. Eugene); father in-law, Billy Byrd; sister-in-law, Lamonica Byrd; nieces, nephews and cousins; and a host of dear friends.

Published in Star-Telegram on Aug. 14, 2013
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