Mary Moon Wilson

Mary Moon Wilson, age 91, of Lula departed this life on Sunday, June 1, 2014, at her residence surrounded by her loving family.

Born Nov. 8, 1922, in Lula to the late Mr. Love Morris and Ms. Beatrice Hargrove. She was preceded in death by her brothers, Richard Hargrove, Howard Moon, Ed Moon, J.C. Moon; and sister, Ruby (Bit) Green.

Mrs. Wilson graduated from Fair Street School in 1942 with honors. In September 1949, Miss Mary Moon moved to Boston and married Mr. Mordecai Wilson in December of that same year. They were married for over 64 years, until her death. Mrs. Wilson had relatives in Washington, D.C., which enabled her to go there during World War II. She was lucky enough to find work and attend Howard University. She was able to get employment at the Pentagon as a cryptographer by inflating her resume, saying she was able to speak several different languages (knowing only the English language) but the interviewer did not ask her to speak any of the languages she claimed to know and eventually got the job. After marriage, the Wilsons moved around to different places, but finally settled in Boston, where they lived for 47 years.

Mrs. and Mr. Wilson were the first blacks to open a Community Group Home for the mentally ill in 1971, in Boston, Mass. For over 20 years, they were the overseer of 32 chronically ill women and men. They were the owners of two homes in Boston, one with 16 rooms and the other had 14 rooms. While living there, they joined the Foster Care Program for a couple of years, before venturing into the group home for the mentally ill. They opened up both homes to mentally ill patients. They took in boys and girls between the ages of 14 and 18, regardless of their nationality or background. Approximately 32 boys and girls were cared for, while being in the Wilsons' Group Home for 25 years. After retiring from both programs, the Wilsons decided to return to Lula, Ga., in 1996 to make Lula their home. To this day, the Wilsons enjoy hearing from the foster girls and the chronically ill men and women by letter, phone calls and personal visits. These men and women are now fully grown with many having children of their own and since retiring, the Wilsons enjoy it when these people send their children's pictures to be hung upon the wall in their home. In Mrs. Wilson's home are the commendations they received from the president of the United States, who was George Bush Sr., at that time, the governor of Massachusetts, Sen. John Kerry and Sen. Edward Kennedy, the superintendent of the hospital who sent their patients to the Wilsons' Group Home, as well as doctors, social workers and friends. The Wilsons were elated that they were able to make people lives much better and richer. They did this by providing an opportunity for people to find a better path to follow than the one they had previously known.

In Mrs. Mary Wilson's own words, "I am happy to say that God provided me with a wonderful husband that supported me with these activities or I would not have been able to accomplish these goals. We pray that God will continue to bless them and us to a happier life. We hope our legacy reflects this, long after our lives are finished."

Survivors include her life partner, Mordecai; sister, Maudine Williams, Lula; sons they claim, Paul, John, Thomas (Spike) and William (Billy) Hailble; her sister-in-law, Zelda Mae Wilson, Boston; and countless nieces and nephews.

Funeral services will be held at Springfield Missionary Baptist Church, Lula, Ga., Saturday, June 7, 2014, at 1 p.m., with Pastor Arthur W. Jones officiating. The family will receive friends on Friday, June 6, 2014, from 6-8 p.m., Wimberly & Jackson Funeral Home, 325 Summit St., Gainesville, Ga. Professional services are entrusted to Wimberly & Jackson.

Funeral Home

Wimberly & Jackson Funeral Home Inc.
325 Summitt Street Gainesville, GA 30501
(770) 536-3251

Published in gainesvilletimes.com on June 6, 2014