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Goldsby, Marlowe  
Marlowe was raised in his beloved Seattle, an only child, by his mother Libby Shapro Goldsby and father Thornton Goldsby, III. His childhood was a very colorful and extraordinary one. After school he would take a streetcar to the Arctic Club (his father was one of the founders) as well as the Rainier Club, of which Marlowe later became a member. At the age of 13, he had the largest Bar Mitzvah ever held at the Seattle Temple. His mother was a pillar of the congregation, helping Jewish immigrants to acclimate to American life. His dear father, who always called Marlowe "Chappy," died in Seattle of pneumonia. At the age of 14, Marlowe contracted pneumonia as well. Libby brought him to southern California for health reasons. She then started the first Reform Temple in Glendale, CA, where Marlowe taught Sunday School for many years. He returned to the University of Washington for college, where he was President of his fraternity, Zeta Beta Tau. He was influential in many instances in bringing young men in as students at the University. One of these was Jamshid Amouzegar, who later became the 71st Prime Minister of Iran. Marlowe and Arlyn were invited many times to visit before the coup. When WWII broke out, he left the University with a friend and enlisted. He was in the 9th Air Force and flew many missions from 1942-1946. Having many dear friends lost, it stayed with him for years. He was a most loyal friend who on one occasion flew to San Francisco for a friend's funeral in a most horrific thunderstorm. He was the only participant there. In his leisure time he flew a seaplane over Lake Washington and the San Juan Islands. He raced cars in Long Beach and was an avid salmon fisherman. Every year, he flew to Alaska with his buddies. He skied all the mountains in the Pacific Northwest and hunted ducks on his yearly trips to Oregon at his uncle's farm. In the early 80's Marlowe established Burton James, a high end upholstered furniture line, which is still in existence. He was also president of the LA Furniture Guild for two years. He was a true intellectual and an avid reader. He adored American history and was a true anglophile. He always said he knew a little bit about a lot of things. Over the years, travels included many exotic places and yearly trips to England. He and Arlyn were frequent guests at Longleat House, with friend Alex Weymouth, now Lord Bath. They also visited the Cotswolds where they were the guests of Sir Robin Fender and his wife Myrtle. Sir Robin was the first test pilot in England for the Sopwith Camel airplane. Their dear friend, Judge Marcus Anwyl Davies entertained them many times at his farm in Sussex and at many formal parties at the Reform Club in London. As his guests, they attended the Changing of the Guards in the private stands. Over the years, they flew one of the first trips on the Concord to London, made an extensive trip on the Orient Express, and sailed the Queen Mary from London to New York so they could see the Statue of Liberty at daybreak. New York was a great high, visiting the museums, shopping, theater and walking the streets of Manhattan, where they stayed twice a year at the Metropolitan Club. Marlowe was generous to a fault, particularly to service people and underdogs. He was a man's man and women adored him. He is survived by the love of his life, Arlyn, and his adoring daughter Jann Goldsby and loving son Wade Goldsby. He is also survived by his stepdaughter, Toby Donner, and her husband Bill, his stepson and wife Steven and Debra Greenwood, and five grandchildren, Jamie, Laura, Aaron, Matthew, and Lauren. Donations in Marlowe's memory may be made to the American Veterans Center, Attn: Gift of Support, 1100 N. Glebe Road, Suite 9 10, Arlington, VA 22201.
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Published in The Santa Barbara News-Press Online Edition from May 2 to May 6, 2015
Gordon, Eugene Clair  
Of Santa Barbara peacefully slipped into the arms of the Lord on Friday, April 3, 2015. He was born March 7, 1921 in Wessington, South Dakota, the second of five children. His father, Maurice Clair Gordon, was a farmer in South Dakota where he met and married Eugene?s mother, Hilda Gunda Lund, a typesetter in Wessington. In 1933, the dust storms of South Dakota and the Great Depression forced his family to abandon the farm and migrate to Puyallup, Washington where Eugene worked on the family berry farm. In October 1939 Eugene "Flash" Gordon left home in his modified Model A Roadster and enlisted in the Army Air Corps, graduating from Air Corps Technical School in Rentoul, Illinois. He was then assigned to Crystal Two, a remote radio station in the Arctic with the Inuit their only neighbors. When the US entered WWII, he was sent to Europe and field commissioned to command a small AACS airborne communications unit. While visiting headquarters in Ascot, he met the love of his life, Mary Louise Green, a junior officer from Chicago. It was a relationship not to be denied. Mary Louise moved to Paris with AACS HQ and Eugene, after roving across France and Belgium in support of Patton, was strangely reassigned to Paris to set up radar at the airport. On December 8, 1944 Eugene and Mary Louise were married in Paris. When the war ended, Gene used his mustering out pay to buy a tractor-trailer rig and start up a new trucking company called Gordon Transport (now Gordon Trucking, GTI). However two years later the U.S. Air Force called him back into the service and he left the operation of the company to his younger brother Jay. Back in the military, regular service postings followed and four children joined the family in five years. In 1954 he flew his family in his Airmaster en route to his new assignment in Japan: first off-base in Nagoya, then on-base at Tachikawa AFB. It was a wonderful posting for all the family. In 1964 he resigned from the service and began employment as a marketing manager for Ratheon in Santa Barbara, California. On August 1, 2006, Eugene lost his wife Mary Louise, the woman he so completely loved. She was his everything. Eugene was a good and honest man. With rock solid integrity and values, he was a provider who always put his family first. At every opportunity he took them on exciting family trips, traveling, camping or skiing. His intentions were always good. Second to his family was work. He loved tackling any job. And the range of his capabilities was remarkable, from overhauling a car engine, installing an avionics component in an airplane to growing an orchard. He loved to fly. His first plane was an Ercoupe followed by a Cessna Airmaster. He especially enjoyed flying his last, a Piper Comanche, frequently accompanied by his adventurous wife or other family members. In his last year, he was cared for by Dr. Margaret Ray and Bonny Uribe, whose dedication and heartfelt care and service gave him much comfort. He is survived by his son Maurice Clair Gordon of St Louis, his daughter Karen Marie Lafferty of San Diego, his son Eugene Clair Gordon Jr of Aberdeen, Scotland, his daughter Mary Katherine Weniger of Carpenteria, eight grandchildren, Stephen Gordon, Laurie Gordon, Jennifer Gordon, Matthew Gordon, Marielle Nagler, Marissa Nagler, Noelle Weniger, Melanie Pepper and three great-grandchildren. He is much beloved by them and will be greatly missed by all who knew him. Private graveside services were held April 10 at Santa Barbara Cemetery with Chaplain Cheryl Donkin officiating. The service was closed with Amazing Grace, played on the bagpipes as he wished.
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Published in The Santa Barbara News-Press Online Edition from May 2 to May 6, 2015
Grady, Nancy Webster (In Memoriam)  
In memory of Nancy Webster Grady.
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Published on www.newspress.com on May 4, 2015
Hernandez, Elias M. (In Memoriam)  
In memory of Elias M. Hernandez.
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Published on www.newspress.com on May 4, 2015
Higbee, Elmer W. "Bill"  
10/5/1929 - 4/13/2015 Elmer "Bill" Higbee suffered a heart attack in his sleep on April 13, 2015. Bill was born October 5, 1929 to Charles and Katherine Higbee. He lived his entire life in Santa Barbara and graduated from Santa Barbara High School, where he played football for the Dons. He married his high school sweetheart, Joara Graham, and they had three children: Dona Mae, Linda Anne and Jeffrey William. Bill and Joara were married until Joara passed away in 1987 after a long illness. Bill was a member of the Goleta chapter of the AMVETS. He also joined the local Elks #613 in 1976 and for many years helped cook dinner every Friday night at the lodge. In 1978 Bill began working for the Vaqueros Camp of the Rancheros Visitadores, helping to set up the camp before the riders arrived. After many years he switched to the Mozos Camp and began working Security. Poor health forced him to quit in 2012. Working for the Rancheros was one of the highlights of his life. He loved the outdoors and nature, the camaraderie of the other men and the entire Visitadores experience. For more than thirty years, Bill was a member of the local senior softball team and traveled with them for tournaments in Kansas, Arizona, Nevada, Utah, Hawaii, and many locations in California. He loved the game, his many friends on the team and the fun of competition. As his health declined, he was unable to continue participating but always held a warm spot in his heart for all the team members. Over the years, Bill held various jobs. He worked for Bekins moving company, then Arden Dairy, and finally joined UCSB's Parking Services in September of 1979 and retired in 1992. It was in late 1987, while working at UCSB, that Bill met Donna Good. They were married two years later and remained devoted to each other until Bill's passing. Bill is survived by his wife, Donna; his daughter Dona Kazmar and her husband, Ted, and their son, Charles; his daughter Linda Higbee and her son, Brian Holguin; his son Jeffrey Higbee and his children, Whitney Higbee, Taylor Higbee, Hilarie Higbee, and Harrison Higbee and his wife Cassie, and their daughter, Hallie. Bill is also survived by Donna's mother, Freda Good. Bill loved people, deeply cherished his friends, and was kind and helpful to everyone he met. He was known at UCSB as "that man at the kiosk with the friendly wave and big smile." He was one in a million and his family and friends will miss him so much. May he receive as much love on the other side as he gave to everyone here. A Memorial Service will be held on Saturday May 9, 2015 at 2:00 p.m. at the First Presbyterian Church (State Street at Constance). The family wishes to warmly invite everyone who was touched by Bill's kindness and smile to join with the family in remembering this wonderful man. There will be a reception at the church after the service.
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Published in The Santa Barbara News-Press Online Edition from May 3 to May 7, 2015
Keoppel, David Carl  
Passed away peacefully on Friday, April 3, 2015 at the age of 82. He was born on November 14, 1932 in Warren, Ohio, the son of the late Donald Rupe and Willa Courter. David served in the Navy during the Korean War. He later started Keoppel and Son, Inc., a local wholesale irrigation supply company. David was a long time member of the Santa Barbara Seventh-day Adventist Church and an ardent student of the Bible. He had a particular interest in biblical archaeology. He is survived by his two daughters, Deborah Reed and Stephanie Keoppel, one son, Eric Keoppel; seven grandchildren, Jeremiah, Tiffany, Summer, Freddy, Brian, Sean, and Shyon; and four great-grandchildren, Anna Belle, Gavin, Jaxon, and Emily. David is preceded in death by his wife of 63 years, Betty Frances Keoppel; one brother, William Post; and one grandson, Christopher Nichols. A memorial service will be held on Sunday, May 3 at 10:00 a.m. at the Seventh-day Adventist Church at 425 Arroyo Road in Santa Barbara, California. In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation to a charitable organization of your choice.
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Published in The Santa Barbara News-Press Online Edition from May 1 to May 5, 2015
Macelhenny Jr., Bernard Joseph  
75 years old, passed away in peace on April 27th, 2015 in Santa Barbara. Bernie was a proud 5th generation Santa Barbarian. He grew up on the West Side of Santa Barbara with drive and ambition fueling him. From the start, Bernie was a master of the deal and drove a hard bargain. His third grade report card from Harding Elementary read, "needs to improve" on fairness in games. But if you knew Bernie, you knew that would be true all his life. He was a proud Yell Leader for the Santa Barbara Dons and got into plenty of trouble at San Jose State University. He transferred back to UCSB to take real estate courses and listed his first house before graduating. In 1964, Bernie started his first real estate firm and established Small, MacElhenny and Brown. He started selling houses and built his first 10-unit apartment building downtown. He took this small company and quickly grew it with many joint partnerships. It was when he partnered up with Jerome Levy to form MacElhenny and Levy that Bernie?s success truly started. The orange sign of MacElhenny and Levy was widespread throughout Santa Barbara and elsewhere in California on houses, buildings, land and almost anything else that could be sold. MacElhenny and Levy grew throughout Santa Barbara and Ventura Counties, and eventually up in Sonoma County. His company had 1,000 salespersons and 30 offices when it was sold to Merrill Lynch in 1981. Following the sale, MacElhenny focused on development of a variety of large commercial, multi-family projects in Santa Barbara and Ventura Counties, Arizona, Healdsburg, the Virgin Islands, and even into the Asian and European markets. Over the next 25 years he owned and managed over 1200 apartments, a large portfolio of commercial and a number of single-family homes. If there was an opportunity, MacElhenny was ready to make a deal. In his later years, he turned a lot of attention to Alzheimer facility development and senior care. Bernie had a passion for travel and throughout his life circled the globe, making friends and doing deals everywhere. But Bernie never forgot his roots. Throughout his life, he always gave back. His generosity ranged from giving to established foundations and scholarships to buying all the neighborhood children ice cream in one of his apartment complexes. His heart was always looking out for the under dog. Bernie is survived by his sister Marlene Jean MacElhenny, former wife Carole MacElhenny, son Michael MacElhenny and his life partner David Wine, his daughter Catherine Dann and his son in law Christopher Dann and his two grandchildren Jackson Bailey and Angus "Agnes" Hollister. His family wishes for privacy at this time. A formal service to honor Bernie will happen at a later date. In lieu of flowers memorial gifts may be made to the Scholarship Foundation of Santa Barbara (P.O. Box 3620, Santa Barbara, CA 93130) or the Central California Chapter of the Alzheimer's Association (1528 Chapala St, Santa Barbara, CA 93101). BJM - May you find your parents, hug your daughter Erin, dine with Nipper and enjoy an Old Overholt Old Fashion light on the sugar
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Published in The Santa Barbara News-Press Online Edition from May 2 to May 6, 2015
Martinez, Josephine "Josie"  
On the morning of Sunday April 26th, 2015, Josephine passed away peacefully comforted by her daughter Cathy at Buena Vista Convalescent home in Goleta, CA as a result of complications from Congestive Heart Failure. She was 79 years old. Josie was born in Santa Barbara CA. Daughter of Josephina Medina and Julio Lopez. Josie is survived by her ex-husband Edward Martinez, her 5 daughters, Frances Lobaugh, Anna Walsh, Cathy Leyva, Mary Bennett, Alice Martinez. 2 grandchildren, Jennifer Dorwin and Nikki Schipper. 2 great-grand children, James and William Dorwin. 7 sisters, Teresa, Mercy, Mary, Carmen, Annie, Angie, Jennie, and brother Manuel. The services will be held at Our Lady of Sorrows church on Friday May 1st at 10am. Burial to follow at Calvary Cemetery, N. Hope Ave. With reception to follow at Dolores Hall/Martin Brewer Center, by Our Lady of Sorrows. If you would like to send flowers for the service, send them to Welch-Ryce- Haider, 15 E. Sola St, SB, CA 93101. To leave an online memory or condolence, please visit www.wrhsb.com . Arrangements entrusted to Welch-Ryce-Haider Funeral Chapels.
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Published in The Santa Barbara News-Press Online Edition from Apr. 30 to May 4, 2015
Matteson Ph.D., Lynn R.  
(1939-2015) Lynn Robert Matteson, Ph.D., age 75, died at Serenity House hospice facility in Santa Barbara, California on Tuesday, April 21, 2015, just seven hours following his transfer there from the Intensive Care Unit at Keck Hospital of USC in Los Angeles. Born in Phoenix, Arizona on September 7, 1939, Lynn was the son and only child of Alva Grenville Matteson (born Kansas, 1900 - died Los Angeles, California, 1945) and Caroline Charlotte Espinoza Matteson Merrill (born Arizona, 1915 - died Concord, California, 1999). While he was still a toddler, Lynn's parents moved from Arizona to Southern California, where he had distinct childhood memories of their East Los Angeles neighborhood now known as Mariachi Plaza. After his father's premature death due to lung disease, Lynn and his mother moved to Stockton, California, then to the Mission District of San Francisco when he was an adolescent. Lynn came of age in the San Francisco of the Beat Generation writers such as William S. Burroughs, Allen Ginsberg, and Jack Kerouac, stand-up comedians such as Lenny Bruce and Jonathan Winters, and spent many (underage) evenings exploring San Francisco's nightlife, sitting on the stoop of nightclubs to eavesdrop on famous jazz musicians and comedians performing at clubs such as The Hungry I. Lynn attended Balboa High School, named after Spanish explorer Vasco Nuñez de Balboa (hence the school's motto: "First on the Pacific!"), where his intelligence and potential was recognized by a teacher, Mike Terzian, who taught an after-school art history class for especially gifted students. Mr. Terzian became one of Lynn's most important mentors, encouraging him to pursue a college education. Lynn was the Valedictorian of his graduating class in 1957, delivering his Valedictory address from the stage of War Memorial Opera House in San Francisco. During this era he also developed a keen interest in sacred music, and sang Gregorian chant in a church choir. While working the night shift as an orderly at Cowell Hospital in Berkeley to put himself through college, Lynn attended the University of California, Berkeley. There he obtained all three of his advanced degrees, starting with a B.A. in History in 1962. He went on to study with the renowned French historian of art and architecture of the medieval era, Jean Bony (1908-1995), earning a Masters degree in 1965 with his thesis on the stained glass windows in the west façade of Chartres Cathedral in France. Lynn's Ph.D. in Art History was awarded in 1975, with his dissertation entitled "Apocalyptic Themes in British Landscape Painting, 1770-1850." Although he initially trained as a Modernist, Lynn changed his focus to European art, and spent most of his career teaching 18th and 19th century European Art. His specialty was British and French Romantic painting, especially the art of J.M.W. Turner (1775-1851), Theodore Gericault (1791-1824), and John Martin (1789-1854), whose art Lynn championed before it was widely known. Lynn was a Chester Dale Fellow from the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., the first recipient from the West Coast. This was significant as before his receipt of this grant, much of the Eastern art establishment disparaged the intellectual seriousness of scholars west of the Mississippi. The prestigious fellowship enabled Lynn to study various art collections in England for a 2-year period. He later returned to London for another year and came to know that city, as well as the museums and churches all over England, Finland, France, Ireland, Italy, Germany and Spain extremely well. Rome was his favorite city and he knew every neighborhood. Lynn's distinguished career as an educator began in 1965, when he was hired to teach Art History at the University of California, Davis. Attracted to the fun-loving artists in the art department, he became friends with the pioneering studio art faculty who are now internationally recognized as some of the most important artists working in America during the 1960s. He regularly played tennis with Wayne Thiebaud, Robert Arneson, and Roy De Forest, and was also friendly with Manuel Neri and William T. Wiley. He became acquainted with many of their graduate students who went on to become famous in their own right, such as Deborah Butterfield, Bruce Nauman, David Gilhooly and Peter Vandenberge. During the UC Davis years, Lynn regularly appeared as an art critic on a television show on KQED-TV in San Francisco. Also during this period, Lynn married a fellow art historian, Mary Ann Perse, who was a specialist in Asian ceramics. The marriage ended in divorce after 12 years, and she went on to establish Kaikodo Gallery in Japan and New York City. In 1980, Lynn was recruited by the University of Southern California, where he obtained tenure and remained Associate Professor of Art History for the remainder of his teaching career. He published countless articles, including the entry on French painter Theodore Gericault in the International Dictionary of Art, as well as reviews of exhibitions ranging from German Expressionist sculpture to British landscape painting. Lynn had an almost photographic memory for images, which is how he discovered the Still Life painting of Flowers and Fruit by Paul Gauguin hanging in the Haggin Museum in Stockton, California. Until Lynn's recognition of it, the painting had been listed as "lost - whereabouts unknown" in the Gauguin catalogue raisonné. Lynn had a tremendous intellect but humble demeanor, and was always one of the most popular lecturers on campus. In 1988, he was appointed Dean of the USC School of Fine Arts (SOFA), which at that time encompassed both art history and studio art (now separated into USC Dornsife and USC Roski School of Art and Design, respectively). He was given one year to make SOFA self-supporting, with the difficult task of reversing the school's need for subsidy by the USC central administration, or face closure. Through painful budget cuts and creative fundraising, Lynn accomplished the feat, but at great cost to his personal health. Even while Dean, he thought that capturing the imagination of undergraduates was so important that he continued to teach the introductory survey courses himself. After five years, he stepped down from the deanship and returned to his first love of lecturing. A vast army of Lynn's former students are today working as teachers, art dealers, museum curators, writers and researchers across America, thanks to his belief in their potential. After his retirement from USC, Lynn continued to review new art books for Choice, a professional publication for university librarians for which he published over 100 reviews during the course of his career. Lynn also recorded extensive interviews of art world notables for the Smithsonian Institution's Archives of American Art, the world's largest resource of the visual arts in America. His interviews with San Francisco art dealer John Berggruen, sculptors John Buck and Deborah Butterfield, and painters Roy De Forest and Manuel Neri, are all available online at www.aaa.si.edu . Lynn was invited to speak as a eulogist at Roy De Forest's memorial service in 2007, gracing the occasion with his eloquent observations and memories. Lynn's reputation as a foodie was established early, and he was known for his love of cooking. In Berkeley he lived downstairs from Alice Waters at the time she was starting her legendary restaurant Chez Panisse, and enjoyed eating the leftovers she would bring home to her neighbors. Although he liked to cook Italian food and dabbled in Indian cuisine, he was famous for his expertise in Chinese cooking. He even cooked a Chinese banquet at his Santa Barbara home for special guest Julia Child. In addition to art, Lynn had a deep love of music, and was extremely knowledgeable about classical music, opera, jazz, and mid-20th century popular singers. He was also a voracious reader with a wide range of interests, but there were two areas in which he read virtually everything ever published -Virginia Woolf and the circle of English intellectuals known as the Bloomsbury Group, and the Cambridge Five, the group of Englishmen working as spies for the Soviet Union from the 1930s to 1950s that included art historian Anthony Blunt, who Lynn once met in person. Lynn was a longtime member of the Chelsea Arts Club in London, a bohemian but venerable institution founded in 1890 by a group of artists that included American painter James McNeill Whistler. In 1998 Lynn received the gift of a liver transplant, which literally restored him to life. He shared the same first name with his second wife, writer Lynn P. Kirst, a fourth generation Californian whom he met when she was obtaining her degree in Art History at USC. They used their newfound time together to travel extensively all over the world. In recent years Lynn suffered several life-threatening health situations, but he always amazed everyone by his ability to recover and carry on. He also wanted everyone to become an organ donor, so that others could receive the gift of life as he had. Special thanks goes to the legions of fine physicians, surgeons and nurses, both in Los Angeles and Santa Barbara, who helped keep Lynn alive over the years. Of particular note are Richard R. Lopez, Jr., M.D. and Allen L. Hoffman, M.D., lead surgeons on the team that performed Lynn's liver transplant nearly 17 years ago. At Keck Medical Center of USC, thanks goes to transplant coordinator Delia Palma, as well as Lynn's doctors Vaughn Starnes, M.D., who performed two open heart surgeries; hepatologists John A. Donovan, M.D., Tse-Ling Fong, M.D., and Jeffrey A. Kahn, M.D.; cardiologist Jerold S. Shinbane, M.D., and nephrologist Arshia Ghaffari, DO, MA, MBA. In Santa Barbara, thanks goes to internist Paul S. Aijian, M.D. and the entire staff at the Santa Barbara Artificial Kidney Center. Despite the many life-threatening medical situations he faced over the years, Lynn was a model patient who never complained or indulged in self-pity. His gentle demeanor was the hallmark of his fine character, and as he was "sotto voce" until the end, most people never knew of his accomplishments. Among Lynn's many friends is documentary filmmaker Susan Jensen, who fortuitously filmed one of his art history lectures given in 2008 on the European Grand Tour. That film has now been uploaded to YouTube and can be watched in its entirety; the web address is: https://youtu.be/GWdIjK2yD0Q Lynn was preceded in death by his parents, as well as his half-sister, Margaret Matteson Gray (1925-2008) of Pawhuska, Oklahoma, an Osage princess who the product of his father's first marriage. His wife and soul mate of 31 years, Lynn P. Kirst of Montecito, California, as well as his parents-in-law, Philip and Colleen Kirst, also of Montecito, survive him. Additionally, he is survived by his Bay Area cousins Caroline and Maria De La Rosa, and many admiring friends. Lynn's funeral Mass will be held at 11:00 a.m. on Friday, May 8, 2015 in Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church, where he married his beloved Lynnski. The church is located at 1300 East Valley Road in Montecito. Graveside services will be held the next day, Saturday, May 9 at High Noon at Santa Barbara Cemetery, 901 Channel Drive, Montecito. Given that music was Lynn's favorite art form, memorial donations will be gratefully accepted by Community Arts Music Association (CAMA), 2060 Alameda Padre Serra, Suite 20, Santa Barbara, CA 93103 ( www.camasb.org )
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Published in The Santa Barbara News-Press Online Edition from May 3 to May 7, 2015
Mendoza, Becky  
88 passed away peacefully after a brief illness on April 29, 2015. Becky was born in Texas on November 5, 1926. The family later moved to Santa Barbara. Becky is survived by her beloved husband Owen and numerous nieces and nephews. Becky was preceded in death by her mother Agipita Diaz, father Gregorio Rodriguez, brother's Gregorio and Jimmy Rodriguez, and sister Annie Escobar. Visitation is May 5, 2015 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Welch-Ryce-Haider, 15 E. Sola St. A Rosary and Mass will be held on Wednesday, May 6th at 10:00 a.m. at Our Lady of Sorrows Church, 21 E. Sola St. Graveside services to follow at Calvary Cemetery.
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Published in The Santa Barbara News-Press Online Edition from May 5 to May 9, 2015
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