- ADVERTISEMENT -

Paul C. Orcutt

Paul C. Orcutt

March 13, 1937 ~ November 12, 2012

Paul passed away on Monday, November 12th. He taught us by example how to be our best possible selves- by being optimistic, curious, engaged, open-hearted, loving and humble, with the gift to make each person he knew feel special.

Paul was born in New York City and moved with his family as a young boy to Syracuse NY, where he grew up and attended Syracuse University. He interrupted his studies to join the Marine Corps and finished college after his service. Paul moved to California and later to Seattle, where he made a career change from business to education. He received his Master's Degree from Seattle University.

Paul was a husband, father, brother, grandfather, uncle, friend, teacher, athlete, warrior (few knew he was a former Marine) and European traveler. He lived a full life with careers in business and then as an elementary school teacher on Mercer Island and European Travel Consultant at Rick Steves' Europe.

Paul was courageous. After suffering a severe stroke on October 25, 2011 he worked tirelessly to regain his ability to walk, speak, read and remember. Every day he attacked his goal with tenacity, focus and courage. And one year later he and his wife Debbie were again in his beloved France, drinking his favorite wines, eating the food he loved and sharing in a culture that spoke to him in a special way.

Paul is survived by his wife, Debbie DeGabrielle, his brother Daniel Orcutt, sister, Heath Abert, daughters, Lori Green and Paige Perotti-Orcutt and son Paul Jr., as well as his grandson, Kevin Green and granddaughters Courtney Check and Lorelei and Shayla Perotti-Orcutt.

A celebration of his life will be held from 5-8PM on Monday, January 14th at the Whale Wins, 3506 Stone Way North, Seattle 98103.

Remembrances can be made to the Virginia Mason Foundation in memory of Paul Orcutt, designated for the 9th Floor Neuro-Rehab Unit. We've established a fund in Paul's name to assist these fine doctors and therapists in supporting their work with other stroke victims to help them regain a full and active life.

We will miss Paul's beautiful big smile, his even bigger heart and infectious laugh. And we will always hold him close and be grateful for the gift of his life.

Published in The Seattle Times from Nov. 28 to Nov. 29, 2012
- ADVERTISEMENT -