Vladimir M. Ushakoff

Vladimir M. Ushakoff

Vlad was born in Seattle on January 17, 1924 to Major Michael M. and Lydia (Lochvitski) Ushakoff. He attended Ballard High School where he was voted "King of Ballard", and remained active in the alumni association, editing and producing the "Golden Beaver" newsletter for many years. He graduated from UW in 1949 with an engineering degree, and was a member of Sigma Chi.

Vlad worked tirelessly in whatever pursuit captured his curiosity and interest - from keeping bees to working on the team that designed and build the Saturn V booster rocket. He was employed with the Boeing Co for over 30 years, many with the NASA division at the height of the US space program's achievements: space travel and the first man on the moon. The possibilities and potential of technological advancement and the exploration of space engaged him throughout his life.

His interests ranged from acting and directing in little theater, playing classical piano, to organizing communities to preserve Snoqualmie Valley's rural character and actively supporting local and national politics.

He was happiest at home with his wife Jean, building their home in Fall City, gardening and caring for their many animals; peacocks, llamas, horses, and their beloved dogs. Still, they found time to travel to Russia, Europe and Alaska. As demanding and exacting as he could be, his capacity for deep kindness and compassion opened with his love for animals or while listening to classical music.

As he wished, he died at home in the comfort of his family. He is missed by his wife of 42 years, Jean, and is survived by his daughter Peggy Ushakoff, stepdaughters Jackie, Bobi and Kathi Beery; and many grand children and great grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his son Michael Ushakoff, and stepsons Joe and Jimi Beery.

Memorials may be sent to UW Office of Gift Processing, Box 359505, Seattle, WA 98195-9505; or Nature Conservancy 1917 1st Ave Seattle, WA 98101.

A memorial service is planned at the Fall City Cemetery December 1 at 1:00.

Published in The Seattle Times from Nov. 17 to Nov. 18, 2012