Home
Resources
NORQUIST Pages (86)
See More >
NORQUIST Mentions
See More >

Brandt M. (Bud) NORQUIST

Obituary Condolences

Brandt M. (Bud) NORQUIST Obituary
Brandt (Bud) M. NORQUIST

Brandt (Bud) M. Norquist passed away August 7, 2012 after a courageous battle with lymphoma. He was born June 8, 1938 in Seattle, Washington to Robert Willard and Betty Brandt Norquist. His father served as Port Commissioner for the Port of Seattle from 1963 to 1969.

Bud graduated from Bellevue High School, class of 1957, where he lettered in football and track. He was active in Young Life and attended their "Malibu" Summer Camp both as a camper and a counselor/water ski instructor. He graduated from the University of Washington in 1961 with a B.S. degree in Civil Engineering, and was a member in the Beta Theta Pi Fraternity where he made many lifelong friends. During his college summers, Bud crewed on a salmon purse seiner, the "Gypsy Queen", where they were High Boat several seasons in a row.

After graduating college, Bud was accepted into the Naval Officers' Candidate School program in Newport, R.I. He graduated O.C.S. on March 7th, 1963, and a week later married the love of his life, LaVey Moore from Montclair, N.J. They spent the next 3 yrs. in Yokosuka, Japan, where their daughter Wendy was born, and then 2 yrs. in Cheatham Annex, Williamsburg, Va., where their son Jeff was born. Following his discharge from the Navy in 1968 as a Lt.j.g. Bud took his family to California to pursue a civilian career.

In 1972, Bud, LaVey, and his brother-in-law, Steve Moore started their own thrift store business partnering with local non-profit organizations in the western states to help raise money for people with developmental disabilities. Norquist Salvage Corp., d.b.a. Thrift Town Stores, just celebrated 40 years in 2012 and has generated over $250 million dollars for their partners.

Bud's enjoyment of boats and waterways continued to manifest itself when he and his wife joined the Coyote Point Yacht Club in 1992 where he served as Treasurer for 3 years, and then Commodore. Bud and LaVey christened their first boat, "Nor'Quest", and headed to Alaska. They fell in love with the Pacific Northwest and continued their cruising together through the next two decades.

Fatherhood, family and good friends were a priority one for Bud as he fully invested his time, love, and resources into camping, water and snow skiing, fishing, boating, scuba diving, hiking, coaching Pop Warner football, float building, river rafting, tennis, golf, and all things adventurous....and even ballroom dancing! In all areas of Bud's life, he "walked the walk" by living his life with integrity, compassion, kindness, generosity, patience, profound wisdom and always with an abundance of humor.

Bud leaves behind his wife, LaVey, of almost 50 years, his daughter, Wendy Lynn (Norquist) Steinmetz, and her husband, Lane, his son, Jeffrey Brandt Norquist and his wife, Michele, his four adoring grandchildren, Brandt Steinmetz (19), Bridget Steinmetz (17), Austin Norquist (5), Tyler Norquist (5), sister Leslie (Norquist) Egloff and husband, Werner, brother Robert W. Norquist, and wife Patricia, brother-in-law Stephen Moore and wife, Kay, and many nieces, nephews, aunts, uncles, and cousins.

Two Memorial Services will be held:

Northwest: Casual Beach Fire Gathering was held on Friday, August 10, 2012.
California: Memorial Service, Sunday, August 19, 2012 @ 12:30pm at Trinity Presbyterian Church, 1106 Alameda De Las Pulgas, San Carlos, CA

"Celebration of Life" Reception, Sunday, August 19, 2012 @ 2:00-4:00pm at Coyote Point Yacht Club, 1820 Coyote Point Drive, San Mateo, CA

Remembrances may be made to the following two organizations very dear to Bud's heart: Young Life-Malibu Club (www.malibuclubyounglife.org), a spiritual program for young people to find guidance, meaning, and a love for the great outdoors. Spirit Bear Youth Coalition (www.spiritbearyouth.org), a nonprofit organization dedicated to creating meaningful and long-lasting sanctuary for the magnificent Spirit Bear.
Published in The Seattle Times from Aug. 10 to Aug. 12, 2012
Read More