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Robert Duane Lundquist

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Robert Duane Lundquist

Robert Duane Lundquist, age 94, passed away on December 4th in Bellevue, Washington. Robert was born February 8, 1918 in Duluth, MN to Agnes and Edgar Lundquist. Following graduation from Duluth Central High School in 1936 at the height of the Depression, he joined the Civilian Conservation Corps. Later, he attended the U.S. Maritime Academy. After graduation from the Academy, he enlisted in the Merchant Marines and spent the WWII years on ships in the Pacific as a Marine Steam Engineer. After meeting on a blind date, Robert married Doris Ruth Johnson (Scotty) in 1943, a marriage that lasted nearly 70 years. After the war, Robert was employed for a short time as a Marine Steam Engineer on the ferries out of the Port of Seattle. He joined the Seattle Lighting Department for the City of Seattle in 1948, working his way up to Principal Steam Engineer by 1960. After retiring from the City of Seattle, Robert went to work as the Port Engineer for Universal Seafood Ltd in Dutch Harbor Alaska. Robert was a member of the Steam Engineer License Board, Refrigeration Engineer License Board, and the Boiler Supervisor License Board for the City of Seattle. At various times, he had been a member of Cross of Christ Lutheran Church Council, a cubmaster, sea scout master, and Little League Baseball manager. His hobbies included fishing, hiking, woodworking, crossword puzzles, and cribbage. Robert is survived by his wife, Doris Lundquist, his daughter Joan Peterson of Wichita, her husband Erick and their two children, Erick and Gregory; his son John of Anchorage, his wife Aileen and two children Mary and Peter; and his daughter Carol Shannon of Long Beach Washington, her husband Mike and their 2 children Matt and Charlie. He is preceded in death by his son Dick in 2009.

A memorial service will be held at Cross of Christ Lutheran Church, 411 156th Ave, Bellevue, WA, at 1 pm on Sunday December 9, 2012.
Published in The Seattle Times from Dec. 7 to Dec. 8, 2012
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