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Breese, Gretchen - San Francisco  
Gretchen Breese July 12, 1954 - April 7, 2016 Gretchen Breese, a resident of Jamaica Plain MA and a former resident of San Francisco, died on the 7th of April 2016, from complications related to ovarian cancer. She died at home, surrounded by friends and family. She is survived by her husband Tom Joaquin, her mother Terry Berman, her step-children Kendra PelaJoaquin, Lucas Joaquin, Jessica Joaquin, Samuel Joaquin and Emma Joaquin. Gretchen was a teacher, sculptor, philosopher, and art theorist. Her areas of academic interest were diverse and included Buddhist and feminist philosophy, Neoplatonism and theological aesthetics. Her sculpture appeared in numerous solo and group shows on both coasts. She was a 1986 NEA grant recipient for her work in architectural theory. Gretchen's education was similarly broad. She earned her Bachelors degree in Art at University of California's College of Creative Studies in Santa Barbara in 1976, and then her MFA in sculpture at Rhode Island School of Design in 1984. In 1987 she went on to earn a Masters in Environmental Design in architectural theory at Yale's School of Architecture, where she was awarded a full fellowship to pursue her studies. At Yale she was also awarded a fellowship to pursue her Ph.D. in Religious studies, for which she completed the coursework before moving on to teach. Gretchen taught philosophy at Ripon College from 1994 until 1998. She joined the faculty at the New England Conservatory 1998, and taught philosophy, sculpture and film studies there. Gretchen believed that learning philosophy changes lives, and that belief undergirded every class she taught. She dedicated herself to teaching each of her students to think critically and to live humanely. Regretfully, Gretchen decided to retire in 2013 due to the debilitating effects of cancer and its treatment. But she rejected the idea that her cancer was an enemy and her illness a war. She saw her disease as a morally neutral result of natural processes and faced it with the same burning curiosity that motivated her throughout her life. She learned everything she could about its biochemistry and genetic basis, followed the research underlying new therapies and became an active part of the Dana Farber team that determined her course of treatment. Gretchen lived her life in a constant pursuit of knowledge, and her enthusiastic and promiscuous curiosity led to strong connections with a wide community of friends who supported her in return quite literally until the morning she died. Those wishing to honor Gretchen's memory may make a donation in her name to: Ovarian Cancer Research, Medical Gynecologic Oncology Program (Ursula Matulonis, MD, Medical Director), Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, 450 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (or use https:// www.kintera.org/site/c.8eIIJWPvG7IQF/b.9127925/k.8B74/Make_a_Gift/apps/ka/sd/ donorcustom.asp and direct your gift to Ovarian Cancer.)
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Published in San Francisco Chronicle on May 1, 2016
Brodnik, Joe - San Francisco  
Joe Brodnik Killed in the line of duty this day 1969. Dad, We love you and miss you. Your loving wife and children.
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Published in San Francisco Chronicle on May 1, 2016
Brown, Rita - San Mateo  
Rita R. Brown April 2, 1925 - April 28, 2016 Rita R. Brown passed away peacefully on the morning of April 28, 2016, shortly after her 91st birthday. Beloved wife of the late Elmer Brown for 43 years and partner to Frank Koplowitz for 10 years. Devoted mother of Alan (Agnès) Mendelson, the late Laurence (Ann) Mendelson, and Debra Mendelson. Adored grandmother of Jonathan (Julia) Mendelson, David (Laura) Mendelson, Jeremy (Stacy) Walker, Elizabeth Mendelson-Goossens (Moka), Rachel (Gregg) Mohrmann, and Mira Laybhen. Great-grandmother to Ella, Ethan, Laina and Trevor Mendelson. Adored sister of Yetta Weiner Marshall and Nathan Spindel, both of late. Auntie Lovey to her 6 nieces and nephews. Born in San Francisco to Yiddish-speaking émigrés Rose and Joe Spindel, 'Rosalie' graduated from Washington High School and later worked for many years at Lowell High School as Administrative Assistant to the Principal. Services to be held at 10:00 a.m., Sunday May 1, 2016, at Hills of Eternity Cemetery Chapel, 1299 El Camino Real, Colma. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the American Cancer Society or Jewish Family and Children's Services (JFCS) of San Francisco, Peninsula, Marin & Sonoma. We especially want to thank the Skilled Nursing staff at Vi of Palo Alto for all their wonderful care. Funeral Services will be held on Sunday, May 1, 2016 at 10:00 am at Hills of Eternity Memorial Park; 1301 El Camino Real, Colma.
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Published in San Francisco Chronicle on Apr. 30, 2016
Bryans, Jason - San Francisco  
Jason Bryans September 22, 1984 - April 19, 2016 Jason Alan Bryans, 31, of San Francisco, entered immortality on April 19, 2016, at his home in San Francisco, CA. Jason was a Wi-Fi engineer at Apple in Cupertino. He greatly enjoyed musical theater, soldering, and scuba diving; loved Halloween and Christmas; and could name a rollercoaster manufacturer just by looking at the rails. He leaves behind a legacy of love and caring, and a hole in the hearts of those who were honored to know him. Jason is survived by his parents, Robert and Nancy, of Mason, MI; his brother Danton and Danton's fiancée, Cara, of Indiana; and a large and loving host of extended family and friends. His funeral mass will be Monday, May 2nd, at 11:00 am (with visitation from 10 am-11 am) at St. Thomas Aquinas Catholic Church in East Lansing, Michigan. A Memorial Service is being planned in San Francisco, CA (exact date and location TBD). The "Jason Bryans Life Celebration Fund" has been created. Details on contributing and fund beneficiaries can be found at goo.gl/mxvbx8. "You always said how lucky you were that we were all friends. But it was us, baby, who were the lucky ones." -RENT
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Published in San Francisco Chronicle on Apr. 24, 2016
Cali, Philip - Danville  
Philip Cali April 24, 1923 - April 25, 2016 Philip Cali passed away peacefully on April 25 in San Jose. He was born in New York City on April 24, 2016 to Salvatore and Filippa Cali. Philip served in the Navy during WWII in the South Pacific as part of the Admiral Spruance staff. He graduated from San Francisco State University with a Bachelor's in 1947 and a Master's in 1950. In July 1947 he married Helena Florence Mitchell. They lived in Millbrae from 1955 to 1980 and then Danville from 1980 to 2015. He loved to play golf, travel, and enjoyed watching the 49ers. Philip was preceded in death by his wife, Helena. He is survived by his children, Christy Cali, and Glenn Cali (Lisa); and his grandsons, Matthew and Nicholas. A Funeral Mass will be held on Saturday, April 30 at 11am at St. Martin of Tours Catholic Church, 200 O'Connor Dr, San Jose. He will be buried at Happy Homestead Cemetery in South Lake Tahoe.
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Published in San Francisco Chronicle on Apr. 29, 2016
Campbell, William - Palo Alto  
William V. Campbell August 31, 1940 - April 18, 2016 To sum up the life of Bill Campbell, who died peacefully in his sleep this week with his family by his side, is a daunting and fundamentally impossible task—Bill's life and accomplishments were so vast and varied that even those who knew him best were only lucky enough to have witnessed a portion of them. Tributes to his astonishing legacy in Silicon Valley have already been pouring in, and rightly so. It is a legacy that is difficult to fathom. He had a hand in almost every consequential technology company of the past 30 years, either through direct relationship or through his coaching and mentoring of the company's key players, (and, in the case of Intuit, Claris, and Go, through his own tenure as CEO). From Apple to Google to Amazon to Twitter, from his mentorship of the iconic venture capitalists who helped shape the Valley to his under-the-radar involvement with legions of nerdy and unsexy companies barely known outside the tech community, but whose presences and innovations changed the technology landscape—Bill was always there, all smiles and hugs, his essence embedded in the company's DNA, pushing everyone involved to be better managers, more creative, and, most importantly, better people, to be the most authentic and truest versions of themselves. He is probably best known for being "the Coach," a mentor to legends; as the legends themselves would be the first to tell you, he was so much more than the sum of those he advised. He was himself a legend. He was the legend. For those who knew Bill, of course, a synopsis of his career in tech only scratches the surface. At Eastman Kodak in the early 80s, before he ever got to Silicon Valley, he was a marketing pioneer whose innovations became best practices across a whole range of businesses. His philanthropy poured millions of dollars into education and youth projects in his hometown of Homestead, PA; into various schools and charitable organizations in the Bay Area; and into his beloved alma mater Columbia University, where he played and coached football, and was ultimately named Chairman of the Board of Trustees, one of the proudest moments of his life. As Columbia's Chairman he helped shepherd projects that changed the face of an already great university, including its expansion into new neighborhoods and a record-breaking fundraising campaign among many other accomplishments. Amazingly, Columbia wasn't the only university on which Bill had an outsized impact. He endowed the athletic director position at Boston College, where in the late 60s and early 70s he'd been the football team's defensive coordinator, and he was integrally involved with Stanford University, consulting on everything from the university's relationship to Silicon Valley to the management of its hospital and medical school to all aspects of the athletics department, especially the football program. He also donated both time and resources to the United States Naval Academy in memory of his brother Jim, who had been a standout football and lacrosse player at the Academy and later a war hero. He was a longtime National Football Foundation Board Member; the award given annually to the nation's top football scholar athlete, the so-called "Academic Heisman," is named the William V. Campbell Trophy. He advised businesses and organizations and people that had nothing to do with tech or sports or education, usually guiding them to successes, but not always. Not every company Bill touched turned to gold; not every business Bill ran turned to gold—he could be animated and even gleeful discussing his (rare) failures because he felt that in those failures were lessons that could and would lead to later triumphs for those he coached. Invariably, of course, he was correct. Any one of these incredibly varied achievements would be enough to overflow multiple obituaries; the fact that they can be attributed to a single person is quasi unbelievable. And even they, in all their listed glory, don't really come all that close to capturing the heart of who Bill Campbell really was. He was a man of beautiful and almost impossible contrasts. He was profane in a way that was unacceptable in many barrooms, let alone in church, and a devout Catholic who rarely missed Sunday Mass. A workaholic who pushed himself and those around him beyond their natural and professional limits, and a devoted husband and quite possibly the best father in history, who never, no matter what momentous occasion was on his schedule, missed an important event in his kids' lives. Famously honest and blunt (and sometimes even harsh), he would never hesitate to let you know when you were "f—ing up"; but when you were f—ing up, he'd be the guy who'd answer your call at all hours of the night and, with inspiring patience and empathy, talk you through whatever mistakes you had made and how you were supposed to rectify them. He preached teamwork and compassion and love. In many ways he seemed a throwback to a different era, a manly man, a jock's jock, gruff, aggressive, macho, old-fashioned, and yet he was comfortable and even thrived around dorks, dweebs, outcasts of all types—a "nerd whisperer," as one journalist put it. His identity as "the Coach" was derived from both his general football-coaching demeanor and his time as an actual football coach, with all the good and bad that that particular stereotype entails; he was a passionate advocate for the advancement of women in Silicon Valley and for the LGBT community. Most of all, he was blessed with the gift of humility. He deflected credit and shunned publicity, rarely if ever granting interviews and often refusing to accept awards until he was nagged into submission and then refusing to accept them again. And yet his life was so full and impactful and so well lived that to not have honored him and made public what he might have preferred remain private would have bordered on the criminal. Over the course of his life he received several prestigious awards, including Columbia University's Alexander Hamilton Medal, whose past recipients include media tycoons, Nobel Laureates, and artistic luminaries, and the National Football Foundation Gold Medal, which has been awarded to multiple U.S. Presidents, Jackie Robinson, and various other heroes and household names. But Bill was never happier than at the annual 8th grade graduation at Sacred Heart Schools in Atherton, CA, when, year after year, a stream of students, boys and girls alike, would offer remembrances and speak movingly of by far their most meaningful experience at the school: getting the chance to play flag football for Coach Campbell, absorbing the lessons he taught them, lessons that were, perhaps not surprisingly, essentially identical to the lessons Coach had imparted to those he'd coached in the adult world. Teamwork. Structure. Integrity. Accountability. Passion. Hard work. Empathy. Love. Coach Campbell hadn't condescended to these kids. He'd treated them the same as he'd treated famous tech visionaries (colorful language included) and the kids had responded by reaching into themselves and finding effort and fortitude they hadn't known existed. Bill loved these moments. His humble and often self-deprecating façade would crack a bit and tears would come to his eyes as he recounted with amazement what the kids had said about him. Those who knew him well were always amazed that he was amazed. Of course the kids would feel like that, we'd tell him. It's what all of us always feel when we're in your presence. There were other moments like this, the moments he loved. He'd feel a grudging satisfaction when some lofty publication or organization made note of his various charitable contributions, but what he really loved was traveling back to Homestead, PA, his beloved and often struggling hometown, which he did frequently. With old local buddies and various other friends he'd sit in Duke's Upper Deck Café, his favorite local bar, throwing back Bud Lights, reminiscing about the trouble they used to get into in high school, laughing and swearing and slapping each other's backs. And in town he might come across a person he'd never met, a mother who would thank him for funding the school her son attended, a father expressing gratitude for the gym his daughter played basketball in or the after-school program that was helping to keep his son out of trouble. He loved these hidden moments more than anything. People in Homestead have said, and will probably say forever, that Bill Campbell never once forgot his roots. It's a refrain you hear often about Bill, from other circles as well. Bill wasn't always wealthy. Well into his forties he often struggled with money. If anything he gave more money back then as a percentage of income than he did later on—which is saying something—often forgoing personal comfort to donate to causes he cared about. His heart was never far from his teammates from the 1961 Columbia Football team, still the only Columbia team to win the Ivy League Championship. These guys knew him long before he became Bill Campbell—they remember him when he was just some humble kid from a steel town, son of a teacher, coarse and a little naïve. To a man they'll tell you he never changed in any of the ways that matter. As would his buddies from Old Blue Rugby in New York. As would those who knew him when he was making the difficult transition from coaching into business. To the end he was still just a "jagoff from Homestead," or a "dumbass football coach." He remained fiercely intelligent and tough-minded, fighting cancer hard to the bitter end. If anything by the end he was even more big-hearted and full of love. A final refrain about Bill, one that's been constantly noted in the many moving tributes to his life, one that rings truer than any and is unbearably painful to think about now that he's gone: Everyone who knew Bill thought of him as their best friend. Bill was a people person. He oozed charisma. He was quick with a witty comment and impossible not to like. When he talked to you he made you feel like you were the only person that mattered. It might be tempting for those who didn't know Bill that well to conclude that all this was just some act, a skill he'd been born with or acquired with hard work. After all, how could it not be? How could one person be so overflowing with joy, with the amount of joy and love requisite for connection with such a staggering number of people on such a profound level? Obviously it had to be an act. It wasn't. He really did love people the way they loved him. New friends were made wherever he went. Often they were baristas, waiters, and, let's face it, bartenders, people who didn't know initially who he was and in some cases never would. He had friends in high and low places and everywhere in between. It was infectious. He was a uniter, he imparted his worldview onto his friends and mixed his groups of friends together, so that friends in California became close with friends from Homestead and New York and elsewhere; wealthy friends grew to love friends who were less well off and vice versa; tech friends, academic friends, and football friends were molded into one great big Bill Campbell group. Bill Campbell was an amazing personal success story and he certainly believed in competition and advancement, but he never saw wealth or social status or anything artificial when judging the merits of people. He sought in others the same qualities he himself so fully embodied—integrity, honesty, humor, selflessness, toughness and kindness in equal measure, and, above all, the ability to open yourself up and love. Bill's friends, and there were many, by definition embodied these values; he wouldn't have been friends with them if they hadn't. He wouldn't have loved them with the fierceness that he did. Bill Campbell really did believe that everyone who lived by these values, friend or not, was fundamentally the same, of equal goodness, of equal worth. On this last point, sadly, he was somewhat mistaken. Indeed when you get down to it most people are essentially the same, most of their differences are artificial. But Bill Campbell was better than everyone. And all of his friends are infinitely better off for having known him. William Vincent Campbell Jr., who was born August 31, 1940 in Homestead, PA and who died April 18, 2016 in Palo Alto, CA, is survived by his wife Eileen Bocci Campbell, his two children Jim and Maggie, and his three step children Kevin, Matthew, and Kate Bocci. A Funeral Mass will be held Monday, April 25th at Sacred Heart Preparatory in Atherton, CA at 11 a.m. In lieu of flowers, the family, per Bill's wishes, requests that donations be made to the American Cancer Society, or, for the benefit of the community of Homestead, PA, to the Campbell Education and Community Foundation.
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Published in San Francisco Chronicle from Apr. 24 to Apr. 26, 2016
Cattolica, Patricia - Walnut Creek  
Patricia M. Wray Kelleher Cattolica Patricia passed away peacefully at home on April 19, 2016. Daughter, wife, mother and grandmother, Patricia was born on October 25,1933, in Washington D.C. to Commander Henry and Mrs. Clara Wray. After extensive travel throughout the world, her family settled in Coronado, CA. She attended high school at Flintridge Sacred Heart Academy, and then went on to obtain a degree from U.C. Berkeley. While at Berkeley, she pledged Alpha Gamma Delta. Predeceased by husbands Mortimer (Mert) Kelleher and Eugene V. Cattolica. Survived by children Mary Kelleher Jones, Sean Kelleher, Erin Wees (Greg), Brian Kelleher (Kathy), Martin Kelleher (Lisa), and seven grandchildren. Also survived by brother Charles (Chip) and wife Anne Wray, and numerous nieces and nephews. Funeral Services will be held at St. Theresa's in Oakland on May 26 at 1:30 PM with a private internment at a future date.
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Published in San Francisco Chronicle from Apr. 29 to May 1, 2016
Cavan, Sherri - San Francisco  
Dr. Sherri Cavan 13 March 1938 - 20 February 2016 Mother, grandmother, teacher, author, sculptor, world traveler, dog fancier and cat lover, Sherri died at her Haight Ashbury home after a brief illness. She is survived, missed, and loved by her son, Adam, grandson, Luca, and daughter in law, Gianna. #bestgmaever
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Published in San Francisco Chronicle on May 1, 2016
Celillo, Paul - Roseville  
Paul E. Celillo April 13,2016 - April 22,2016 Paul E. Celillo AKA Butch passed away peacefully in Roseville CA on April 22, 2016 at the age of 72. Paul is survived by his mother Elizabeth Celillo, wife Margaret Celillo, children Theresa Borelli, Thomas Celillo, Michelle Torres, Paul Borelli, Michelle Celillo, Andrew Torres, grandchildren Nicole Borelli, Joseph Borelli, Dominic Celillo, Marco Celillo, Geno Celillo, Seraphina Torres, great grandchild Anthony Franklin. Paul's siblings Don Celillo, and Larry Celillo. He is preceded in death by his father Paul Milton Celillo. Paul was an accomplished electrician on 57 years, and business owner of 40 years. He was a generous, loving, dedicated husband, son, father, grandpa, Nono, and friend to all. Paul was active in his community his whole life and a member with a few of the clubs listed: Millbrae Lions Club, I.A.S.C, Y.M.I, NECA, Knights of Columbus (3rd Degree), and Rods & Relicks. A funeral is scheduled for Friday April 29, 2016 at Calvary Catholic Cemetery 7101 Verner Ave., Sacramento 95841. Times are as followed: 11:00 - 1:00 will be the memorial viewing, and Father Eric Lofgren will begin mass at 1:00. All are welcome to attend and celebrate Paul E. Celillo's life. The family would like to thank Brookdale Sterling, and Sutter Roseville Oncology department for all of their efforts and care given to our father and his family.
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Published in San Francisco Chronicle on Apr. 27, 2016
Chandler, Jon - Santa Rosa  
Jon Clinton Chandler Jon Clinton Chandler of Kenwood and San Francisco, California died amongst oak trees and surrounded by Family on 3/31/16 after battling AITL lymphoma. He was born in Santa Rosa on 7/22/85 to Darien and David Chandler as a twin and the youngest of four sons. Jon was charismatic, intelligent and a true romantic. A graduate of MCHS ('04), CSU Chico ('09 BA PoliSci) and GGU School of Law ('14 JD with honors). He was a lawyer working with his Dad and eldest Brother, an avid skier (National Ski Patrol at 18, Tahoe hot dog) and the consummate companion to those fortunate enough to share his presence. He was warm, thoughtful, adventurous and full of wit in spite of life-threatening challenges throughout his 30-years. Experiences bred Jon into a warrior with the heart of a lion. He overcame obstacles and achieved goals, and always with a smile, kindness and fine attire. Not once did he waver in loving others and enjoying life to the fullest. Grieving family includes Parents, brothers Rob (fraternal twin), Dave (Leah) and Christian (Paula), nieces Isabella and Anna, nephews Lucas and Jonathan (due 10/16), aunt Linda Chandler and cousins Allison Murphy (William), William III and Cassidy Murphy, Jasmin Ford and Jalen Lewis (Ahlee Lewis). A celebration of Jon's amazing life will be held at the Chandler Family home in Kenwood on May 7, 2016 from 1-4pm. Contact darienmcfnp@gmail.com for directions.
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Published in San Francisco Chronicle on Apr. 24, 2016
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