ALICE G. WOODBY


WOODBY ALICE GOODSON HART WOODBY World War II Codebreaker Dies at 101 July 21, 1912 ~ June 16, 2014 Alice was born in Columbus, Kansas, on July 21, 1912 and moved to Warrensburg, Missouri, where she grew up with her older sister Bernice and younger brother Marc. She was one of the women who made great contributions to our nation and was one of the women who continually led the way for professional women. She was the youngest graduate from Central Missouri State Teachers College in 1930 at the age of 17 when she received three degrees: Bachelor of Science in Mathematics, Bachelor of Science in Education, and Master of Arts in History. Soon after she became a high school teacher (teaching students older than she was), and taught at various schools and junior colleges until 1943. In summers she did graduate work at Louisiana State University and The University of Missouri. On May 31, 1943, at the age of 30, she walked through the gates of Arlington Hall Station to be sworn in as an Army Cryptanalyst to work on Japanese Codes. She made significant contributions there, being key in breaking the codes that gave us the final disposition of the German forces just prior to the D-Day invasion at Normandy 70 years ago. While at Arlington Hall, she met and married Army Intelligence Officer and Cryptanalyst Lt. Hyman H. Hart on May 13, 1944, at St. John's Episcopal Church in Washington, DC. Hy was with the invasion of Okinawa, and after WWII left active service, but was called back for Korea. After WWII ended, they made their home in Tacoma, Washington. Alice started working in the business world, but came to realize that what she wanted to do was teach, which she did in Tacoma until 1958. In 1958, Alice received two awards from the National Science Foundation, Institute for Teachers of Mathematics, one at the University of Illinois and one at the University of Chicago. The family moved to the University of Illinois at Urbana where Alice completed her advanced degree in mathematics, and Hy received his PhD in English Literature (Shakespeare). Alice was the Director of many Academic and Summer Institutes funded by the NSF for in-service teachers. For five summers she taught at Gallaudet College for the Deaf in Washington, DC. Alice was President of the Illinois Council of Teachers of Mathematics and served on several committees for the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics and was a consultant for the US Office of Education. She was selected as one of the hundred distinguished alumni honored at the Centennial Celebration of Central Missouri State College. Her two sons, Bennett and Michael, were both Eagle Scouts and graduated from the University of Illinois. Bennett served in the Army as an Intelligence Officer and in the Department of Defense in the Senior Executive Service. He married Margaret Porento of Chicago, Illinois. Alice has one granddaughter, Elizabeth, who is a graduate of Virginia Tech, and works on Vice-President Biden's Staff at the White House. Michael, who graduated with straight A's, served in the Army, went on to found Project Gutenberg, and is credited as the Inventor of E-Books. Alice continued to teach at the University of Illinois (Chicago Circle) and became a Full Professor in 1971. In 1976 she divorced and moved to The Ohio State University. In 1982, Alice married Lauren Woodby, a fellow professor at Ohio State. They retired to Niceville, Florida, where Lauren died in 1991. Alice returned to Northern Virginia, to be near family members. She chose the Fairfax Retirement Community for her home and was active in the DAR, genealogy, bridge and helping others with computers and the challenge of working through health billings. Alice laid down her earthly work tools finally on the 16th of June, 2014. Memorial service will be held Sunday, June 22 at The Fairfax, 9140 Belvoir Woods Pkwy., Ft. Belvoir, VA 22060 at 2 p.m. Memorial service will be held Sunday, June 22 at The Fairfax, 9140 Belvoir Woods Pkwy., Ft. Belvoir, VA 22060 at 2 p.m.

Funeral Home

Demaine Funeral Home
5308 Backlick Road Springfield, VA 22151
(703) 941-9428

Published in The Washington Post on June 22, 2014