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Martin Cohen Obituary
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September 20, 2018

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Preview Entry
September 20, 2018

Please don't submit copyrighted work; original poems, songs or prayers welcomed. Legacy.com reviews all Guest Book entries to ensure appropriate content. Our staff does not correct grammar or spelling.

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 Memories & Condolences
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January 16, 2018
For so many years, I saw Marty regularly ar LJC. He was part of my life. Although we both moved away from our old homes, I still think of and miss him. May memories of him bring solace to Bonnie and the rest of the family
January 7, 2018
I first met Marty Cohen, or "Good Looking" Cohen as he would often call himself, when I joined the staff at the Jewish Federation of Metropolitan Chicago in the fall of 1997. Around the time I started working with him, Marty had recently returned to work following treatment for cancer that everyone thought should have killed him then, more than 20 years ago. I quickly learned that we had something in common. We were both runners and we actually ran together on more than one occasion, often with Marty teasing me the entire time. There is one particular run with Marty, though, that is seared in my memory. It was in Central Park in New York City circa 1998. I was in New York for a conference and Marty was in New York undergoing some pretty intensive rounds of cancer treatment. As I understood it, he was spending about 6-8 hours every other day hooked up to an I.V. unit that was pumping his body full of all kinds of cancer-fighting chemicals. Since we were going to be in New York at the same time, I gave Marty the name and phone number of my hotel (this was the pre-cellphone era) in case he needed anything. One morning, shortly after 5:00 a.m., the phone in my hotel room rang. It was Marty, and he wanted to go for a run. He had undergone treatment all day the previous day and the morning that he called me was a non-treatment (read: recovery) day for Marty. He sounded absolutely horrible on the phone and when I met him about 20 minutes later at the corner of Central Park South and 5th Avenue, he looked even worse. I am certain that I asked him more than once if he was sure that he wanted to run, and I am also fairly certain that he responded with snarky retorts about my ability to keep up with him. So we ran. And we ran and ran some more. As the sun came up and the streets and sidewalks of Manhattan began to fill with cars and people, Marty was looking worse and worse (though still good looking). We ran the entire Central Park Loop (more than 6 miles) up the East Side to 110th Street across to Central Park West and back down along the West Side and then back along Central Park South to the big golden statue of William Tecumseh Sherman where we had originally met before the sun had come up. Over the years that I have known Marty and that I have told and retold this story, I have never ceased to be inspired by him. I would often tell people that Marty was running away from cancer, and I actually believe that to be true. Think about it. More than 20 years ago, Marty was diagnosed with a horrible disease and given a grim prognosis. His response was simple. He laced up his running shoes, made fun of just about everyone he knew, including himself, and he just kept on running, and running and running Thank you, Marty for your inspiration, for your humor, and for your ability to laugh in the face of adversity and then run away from it. Rest in peace, Marty, your memory is and always will be for a blessing.
January 7, 2018
If Marty knew I was complimenting him, he would stop in his tracks, give me one of his looks and shake his head in disbelief. And I am in disbelief that no longer will I hear him playfully insult me. However, I can tell you that this man was a mensch and even though I would insult him back, I suffered him gladly. The relationship he had with Bonnie (Bracha) was enviable. He adored her, his son Andrew, and his precious granddaughter. We have lost a good man but elsewhere has gained.
January 6, 2018
Hey Good Looking... I will miss you terribly!