William Kenneth Hachmann
1944 - 2018
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Hachmann, Mr., William Kenneth Norton Shores Mr. William Hachmann, age 73 passed away Sunday evening February 18, 2018. William was born June 18, 1944 in Prairie du Chien, WI to Henry R. and Doris L. (Birch) Hachmann. Bill grew up in Chicago where his favorite pastime was swimming in Lake Michigan. He married Christine on June 7, 1969, after catching her eye in his British sports car. Bill earned his Master's degree from Western Michigan University and spent the next 33 years teaching 9th grade in the Mona Shores School System. Bill also coached tennis for many years, worked summers with the Norton Shores Parks and Recreation Dept., and was a longtime member of the Michigan Education Association. He was a hard worker and a wonderful provider. Bill was an avid reader, a sports car enthusiast and enjoyed listening to jazz and classical music. He also enjoyed camping, photography, and being part of the Mona Shores football chain gang. Bill was a wonderful husband, father and grandfather and his memory will be cherished by Christine, his wife of 48 years; his children, Stacey (Kevin) Hachmann-Gomez of Norton Shores and Eric (Michelle) Hachmann of Grand Rapids; grandchildren, Anna and Ella Gomez and Lane Shephard. Bill was preceded in death by his parents. A MEMORIAL VISITATION will be held Friday, February 23, 2018 from 4-7 PM at The Lee Chapel, 6291 S. Harvey St.231-798-1100. Share memories with the family at Bill's online guestbook at www.sytsemafh.com


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Published in Muskegon Chronicle from Feb. 19 to Feb. 20, 2018.
MEMORIAL EVENTS
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March 15, 2020
79TH ST. W OF COLFAX - 1958 - N FROM CELANDER PHOTO SHOP - WE BOUGHT CHRISTMAS CARDS & WRAP AT CARY'S (LEFT) - CUNIS ICE CREAM WAS A LOCAL LEGEND
JOHN CHUCKMAN
March 14, 2020
Here is a short story written many years ago in which Bill Hachmann is one of the main characters.

PUPPY LOVE: A SHORT STORY BY JOHN CHUCKMAN
SET IN THE OLD SOUTH SHORE NEIGHBORHOOD, CHICAGO.

THE TWO MAIN CHARACTERS ARE BILL AND I, RENAMED, AND THE EVENT RESEMBLES SOMETHING WHICH DID HAPPEN...




They pressed their faces tight against the window with their hands shading the sides of their eyes. It was a big window with the reflections of all the stores across 75th Street and the sun shimmering off the glass.

Jack and Willy had seen her going into Ray's Pizzeria from about a block away. There was no mistaking her even from that distance.

They couldn't see much without smooching up the glass. It probably made them look a little goofy inside. But that didn't matter. She was in there. And they wanted a good look.

Gee, there she is.

Yeah, but she's sittin' with some guy.

The object of their efforts was a girl named Marie.

Neither one of them ever said a word to her. They probably never would. Jack and Willy were twelve, almost thirteen, and she was fourteen. That alone made her practically unapproachable.

Besides she was kind of hoody. The kind of girl that went out with guys that smoked, guys with initials carved into heavy black belts. That made her a little scary. And indescribably exciting.

She was a sultry goddess. They got glimpses of her at school last semester. They'd both crane their necks if she passed in the hall and then turn away, nervously laughing and snorting, afraid those dark eyes might just look right into theirs.

They'd talk about seeing her at recess. About her black hair done in a French twist. The bangs over her big, velvety eyes. Round cheeks with powder and pink stuff on them. Big red lips. And the straight skirts she wore.

Now they wouldn't see her anymore. She was in high school.

Man, oh, man, is she beautiful, Willy said, pulling his face from the window.

Yeah, there ain't another girl that comes close.

Yeah, an' you should see her legs.

Willy was referring to the claim he'd seen her once in her gymsuit playing dodgeball. The sight was unforgettable, because he described it in detail every time her name was mentioned.

Ya wanna hang aroun' an' see when she leaves?

Yeah, sure.

Just then this tough-looking guy rushed out the door. He was looking straight at them. It took a second for them to realize what was happening, but it was the guy who was sitting with her. And he didn't look happy.

Hey, ya little jerks, whatcha think you're doin' there?

He charged right up to Jack. It was the way hoody guys do things, without giving you a chance to think about what was going on. He was still talking when he shoved Jack so hard, he almost fell backwards on the sidewalk. He only caught his balance with a lot of panicky arm-waving.

Jack and Willy didn't need to say a word to each other. They both knew instinctively what to do. They turned and ran as fast as they could.

That surprised him a little. So they got a head start. But as they rounded the corner to Coles Avenue, Jack could see the guy take off after them. He was yelling something at them.

They turned off Coles into the alley behind the stores. Then into a gangway behind some apartments. They hit one set of back-porch stairs flying, racing up the wooden stairs, two or three at a time, until they got to the third floor. Then they collapsed on the porch, breathing hard, hearts pounding.

At first, all Jack could think about was how stupid he looked, getting shoved around like that and running away like a rabbit. In front of her. But the thought of how much stupider he'd look on the sidewalk with a bloody nose made him feel better.

They raised their heads just enough to look down between the edge of the porch and the bottom of the banister. They had a clear view down into the alley from up there. But almost right away they ducked back down against the rough, gray boards. He was there, looking around for them.

We better jus' stay here a while. Maybe he won't go lookin' up here, Jack breathed the words, trying to whisper and pant at the same time.

Yeah, even if he thinks of the porches, he don't know what one we're on. For all he knows, we live aroun' here, an' we're already home.

But what if he comes up?

We'll jus' both kick at him comin' up the stairs. He won't be able to get up here with both of us kickin' at his face.

That thought was reassuring. They were really scared, but they weren't helpless. There was something they could do. They were actually pretty safe up there. They used to hide like this, playing cowboys and Indians, on back porches all over the neighborhood. All that practice was coming in handy now.

What if he's got a switchblade?

Jack hadn't thought of that. He sure looked like he could have one. Greased-back hair and a sneery look on his face. Just wearing a tight undershirt. And the thick black belt and engineering boots every hoody guy strutted around in.

I don't know. Jack looked around a little, scraping his cheek on the wood. Just like on all the back porches of all the old apartment buildings, there was a big garbage can standing in one corner, the kind made out of gray, ribbed steel with handles on the sides.

We'll throw the garbage can on him. An' there's a couple of pop bottles over by the door. We could throw those, too.

Yeah, good idea. Willy whispered. If we hear him on the steps, we better get the garbage can ready to throw fore he gets up.

Yeah, he sees us up here with that, there's no way he's comin' up.

They stayed there, still, except for their breathing, listening for any sounds on the stairs. After fifteen minutes or so and several nervous peeks under the banister, they figured it was safe.

They crept down slowly, crouching as they went, hoping to see a little farther ahead to the next landing, grabbing both banisters tightly with each step. Just like in cowboys and Indians, he could be there, waiting for you to come down the stairs.

Their sneakers didn't make a sound. But here and there an old board creaked.

If ya see him, jus' run back up an' get ready to kick him. Aim for his face, Jack whispered.

But he was gone. By the time they got back out into the alley, they were feeling pretty good.

Which way ya wanna go?

Let's go the same way we were.

They left the alley and turned back up toward 75th Street. When they got near the corner, just as a precaution, they flattened themselves against the wall of the building. Willy peeked around the corner.

Not a sign. Let's go.

They raced away from the pizzeria. But pretty soon they slowed down and stopped looking over their shoulders. They got back to the way they usually walked. Arms and legs swinging carefree. Pants cuffs and laces flapping around. Sneakers scraping the sidewalk when they pushed each other or stopped to look in some of the stores. Laughing at just about anything.

As they came up to Exchange Avenue, several girls came out of the Coronet Restaurant on the corner ahead. They started across the street toward them.

You could tell from out in the street they were older. Some of them had makeup and straight skirts. High-school girls. Probably fourteen or fifteen. They were laughing and talking, turning their heads back and forth with their hair swinging around, as they walked all bunched together almost like a group picture for a yearbook.

Jack and Willy elbowed each other and laughed when they first saw them. As they got closer, the boys straightened up and the laughs changed to little whispered comments through lips that hardly moved. When the girls got really close, Jack and Willy were quiet. Just plain stiff and nervous actually.

As they passed, one girl's voice and then another said Hello, boys. Kind of slow and silly. Then there was a chorus of giggles and laughs.

Jack and Willy didn't say a thing. They just looked straight ahead and walked like they were afraid of tripping on their shoelaces. But when the girls were a safe distance away, they suddenly stopped and turned around.

Man, did ya hear that? Did ya hear that? Jack bent over like the wind was knocked out of him. They were talkin' to us!

Willy shouted, Ya, man, an' that blond with the ponytail, what a dream! I couldn't believe she was real.

Aw, did ya see the one with red hair? Man, was she sharp-lookin'!

Sharper than Marie?

Ya know, when ya think about it, Marie really ain't all that great. I mean, she's pretty nice, but she don't compare to what we jus' saw.

Jack and Willy watched the girls till the last of their bouncing hair and swaying skirts disappeared around the corner where 75th Street turned a little. Then they started walking again, weaving back and forth along the sidewalk, laughing and snorting, pushing and elbowing. Willy was telling Jack about what kind of legs the blond girl probably had.
March 2, 2020
ANN SWAN - CROSSING GUARD AT 78TH AND EXCHANGE AVE - BILL WOULD HAVE KNOWN HER - A MUCH-LIKED WOMAN AS THE SMILE TELLS YOU - 1958 - DAVID ALEXANDER
JOHN CHUCKMAN
March 2, 2020
RAINBOW BEACH SOUTH SHORE CHICAGO LOOKING SOUTH FROM NEAR 77TH WHERE BILL LIVED - FAIRLY BUSY DAY - 1960
JOHN CHUCKMAN
March 2, 2020
78TH STREET NEAR COLFAX AVE LOOKING WEST - CATHEDRAL OF ELM TREES - 1967 CHUCKMAN PHOTO
JOHN CHUCKMAN
March 2, 2020
RAINBOW PARK TREED PARKLAND WALKWAY NOT FAR FROM BILL'S APARTMENT
JOHN CHUCKMAN
March 2, 2020
POSTCARD 1942 - 56TH AND SOUTH SHORE DRIVE HYDE PARK LOOKING SOUTH TOWARDS SOUTH SHORE AND BEACHES
JOHN CHUCKMAN
March 2, 2020
I.C. STATION AT 71ST AND JEFFERY WITH TRAIN AND CROWD - HOW IT LOOKED IN 1955 - JEFFERY THEATER WAS ONE OF OUR NICEST
JOHN CHUCKMAN
March 2, 2020
WINDSOR PARK I.C. STATION - EXCHANGE AVE BETWEEN 75TH AND 76TH - WHERE BILL WOULD GET A TRAIN FOR DOWNTOWN
JOHN CHUCKMAN
March 2, 2020
MYRA BRADWELL ELEMENTARY GRADUATION PROGRAM JAN 28, 1959 - BILL AND PRESTON AND I ARE LISTED
JOHN CHUCKMAN
March 2, 2020
SOUTH SHORE HIGH SCHOOL AUDITORIUM - JAMES WATSON 1962 NOBEL PRIZE WINNER GIVING A TALK - HE ATTENDED SSHS - NOTE BAND UNIFORMS
JOHN CHUCKMAN
March 2, 2020
SOUTH SHORE HIGH SCHOOL MAIN ENTRANCE - 7627 S CONSTANCE AVE - 1959
JOHN CHUCKMAN
March 2, 2020
MYRA BRADWELL SCHOOL - MAIN ENTRANCE - 7710 S BURNHAM AVE - GROUND FLOOR WINDOWS ARE THE LIBRARY - OCT 1968 JOHN CHUCKMAN PHOTO
JOHN CHUCKMAN
March 2, 2020
A WONDERFUL CUSTOM - CLASS PICTURE FOR HALLOWEEN - NOT OUR CLASS - 1955 WHEN WE WERE IN 5TH GRADE
JOHN CHUCKMAN
March 2, 2020
SOUTH SHORE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH - 2824 E 76TH AT SOUTH SHORE DRIVE - SCOUT MEETINGS WERE FRIDAY NIGHTS
JOHN CHUCKMAN
March 2, 2020
SOUTH SHORE HIGH SCHOOL ROTC SHOULDER PATCH - BILL, PRESTON, AND I WERE ALL IN ROTC - 1962
JOHN CHUCKMAN
March 2, 2020
BOY SCOUT PATCH FOR SOUTH SHORE CAMPOREE 1959 - BILL AND I ATTENDED - WORN OVER THE FRONT POCKET OF SCOUT UNIFORM SHIRT
JOHN CHUCKMAN
March 2, 2020
BOY SCOUT PATCH FOR SOUTH SHORE CAMPOREE 1958 - BILL AND I ATTENDED - WORN OVER THE FRONT POCKET OF SCOUT UNIFORM SHIRT
JOHN CHUCKMAN
March 1, 2020
PRESTON UNEY - 2008 AND1955 - https://chuckmanplaces.wordpress.com/2009/09/19/on-the-death-of-an-old-good-friend/
JOHN CHUCKMAN
March 1, 2020
WARREN DUNES PARK NEAR SOUTH HAVEN MICHIGAN - KIND OF VIEW BILL WOULD SEEN MANY TIMES - CHUCKMAN IMAGE - 1980
JOHN CHUCKMAN
March 1, 2020
RAINBOW BEACH (CALLED MANHATTAN THEN) POSTCARD - LOOKING NORTH FROM ABOUT 77TH - c1910
JOHN CHUCKMAN
March 1, 2020
RAINBOW BEACH AND PARK - LOOKING WEST - NEAR 77TH - LOW BUILDING IS WASHROOMS AND WARMING HOUSE IN WINTER
JOHN CHUCKMAN
March 1, 2020
RAINBOW BEACH LOOKING NORTH FROM NEAR 77TH WHERE BILL LIVED - c 2010
JOHN CHUCKMAN
February 29, 2020
RAINBOW GARDENS - NOT FAR FROM BILL'S BACK PORCH LOOKIN NORTH G NORTH - OCT 11, 1968
February 29, 2020
CLASS PICTURE - GRADE 7B - 1957
NOTES FOR PHOTOS:

FIRST CLASS PICTURE - BRADWELL SCHOOL - GRADE 6B - MR WALTER KAZMIER, A MUCH BELOVED TEACHER, STANDS NEXT TO THE CLASS.

ALL NAMES ARE SUBJECT TO THE VAGARIES OF MEMORY AND SPELLINGS ARE APPROXIMATE AT BEST.NAMES GIVEN LEFT TO RIGHT:

BACK ROW:
SHEILA HANSEL/ PRESTON UNEY/ RONNY BANKS/ JAY GOLDENBERG/ ? ?/ JOHN ROSS/ GEORGE CADDICK/ ANN MARIE SANDBERG/ ELAINE LOTT/ ARTHUR STOIKEY/ SARA SHOCKETT/ SUSAN LEWY/ RICHARD AUSTIN/ ADRIAN "CORKEY" JONES

THIRD ROW:
ANN BLITZSTEIN/ JOANNE KOZLOWSKI/ GAIL SHAPIRO/ BARBARA SCHNITZ/ FLORENCE "FLOSSIE" CHORLEY/ JILL SHAPIRO/ BOB PEARSON/ BILL HACHMANN/ JUDY LUND/ CAROL BACHENHEIMER/ ? ?/ EUNICE SCHULMAN

SECOND ROW:
JANICE WELCH/ LORRAINE BORLAND/ JUDY ANDERSON/ SHARON FRIEDMAN/ HENRIETTA "COOKIE" GERSTAL/ DAVE BUFFIN/ JANET "MY MOTHER IS PRESIDENT OF THE PTA" MARTIN/ JOHN CHUCKMAN/ CAROL BIERMAN

FRONT:
PAUL "DEUTCH'S PAINTS" DEUTCH/ HOWARD SHLESS/ PATRICK ?/ BRUCE KAUFMAN

RIGHT SIDE:
WALTER KAZMIEROWSKI - SHORTENED AT SOME POINT TO: KAZMIER.

AS HE STOOD IN, MR. KAZMIER PROMISED, WITH HIS WONDERFUL DRY WIT, THE PICTURES "WILL SELL LIKE HOTCAKES NOW." HE WAS TRULY THE KIND OF MEMORABLE TEACHER YOU HAVE ONLY A FEW TIMES IN LIFE.

NOT IN PICTURE:
SQUEAKY THE DUCK, CLASS PET - KIDS USED TO TAKE TURNS BRINGING HIM HOME FOR WEEKENDS, CARRYING HIM IN HIS PEN

___________________

SECOND CLASS PICTURE - BRADWELL SCHOOL - GRADE 7B - BILL IS STANDING NEXT TO ME IN THE BACK ROW TO THE VIEWER'S LEFT.

___________________

RAINBOW GARDENS- OCT 11, 1968 - THE GARDENS CHANGED WITH THE SEASONS - THEY WERE SURROUNDED BY A TREED PARKLAND - BEYOND WERE BALL FIELDS AND TENNIS COURTS - AND THEN THE BEACH BEHIND A LOW RETAINING WALL - IN THE WINTER THERE WAS ICE-SKATING ON ONE OF THE BALL FIELDS DOWN NEAR 75TH, INCLUDING UNDER LIGHTS AT NIGHT - A DELIGHTFUL, MEMORABLE PLACE ALTOGETHER AND WHAT A WONDERFUL THING TO HAVE AT YOUR BACK DOOR - CHICAGO HAD SOME OF THE MOST WONDERFUL PARKS

___________________

APARTMENT BUILDING SOUTH SHORE DRIVE THIS WAS BILL HACHMANN'S BUILDING HIS FAMILY HAD THE TOP FLOOR TAKEN OCTOBER 11 1968 ON A VISIT - I BELIEVE FROM GOOGLE EARTH THAT THE BUILDING NO LONGER EXISTS - SO MUCH CHANGED IN SOUTH SHORE IN THE YEARS AFTER OUR TIME

THE APARTMENT WAS QUITE SMALL - BILL'S PARENTS SLEPT IN THE FRONT ROOM UNDER THE BUILDING'S TURRET STRUCTURE - BILL DIDN'T REALLY HAVE A TRUE ROOM BUT A KIND OF SIZABLE CORNER NOOK PLACE WITH HIS BED AND HIS MODELS (HE LIKED BUILDING PLASTIC MILITARY MODELS) LINED UP ON THE UPPER RAILING OF THE HALF-WALL BY THE STAIRS - THE KITCHEN WAS HIS VIEW LOOKING NORTH FROM HIS BED - IT WAS SUNNY WITH WINDOWS OVER THE SINK - TURNING EAST WAS THE BACK DOOR AND THE VIEW OF THE PARK AND THE LAKE - THAT WAS THE WONDERFUL THING ABOUT THE SMALL APARTMENT, STEPPING OUT ON THE BACK PORCH TO THE SIGHT AND SOUND AND SCENT OF THE LAKE AND ALL THE TREES OF RAINBOW PARK. I RECALL ALSO THERE WAS OFTEN A PILE OF THE THEN VERY HEFTY CHICAGO TRIBUNE ON TOP OF THE RADIATOR NEAR THE BACK DOOR.

I LIVED ABOUT A MILE AWAY AT 79TH AND ESSEX AND LATER AT 78TH AND COLFAX - MANY OF THE STREETS THEN, INCLUDING 78TH WALKING EAST TOWARDS BILL'S PLACE AND THE PARK, WERE LINED WITH GLORIOUS OLD ELM TREES, A VERY PLEASANT MEMORY.
JOHN CHUCKMAN
February 29, 2020
RAINBOW GARDENS - NEAR BILL'S APARTMENT - OCT 11, 1968
JOHN CHUCKMAN
February 28, 2020
BILL'S APARTMENT IN SOUTH SHORE - BACK SIDE FROM RAINBOW GARDENS
JOHN CHUCKMAN
February 28, 2020
ALL NAMES ARE SUBJECT TO THE VAGARIES OF MEMORY AND SPELLINGS ARE APPROXIMATE AT BEST. NAMES GIVEN LEFT TO RIGHT: BACK ROW: SHEILA HANSEL/ PRESTON U
JOHN CHUCKMAN
February 28, 2020
So sorry to just come upon this.

Bill and I were best friends around the ages of ten to thirteen or fourteen. We went many places together. I had an interest in building little rockets at the time and often went over to Bill's so we could blast one off in Rainbow Park. Of course, we also loved the beach.

We joined Boy Scouts together - Troop 594 in the South Shore neighborhood, Chicago - and had many goofy adventures on overnight trips, like the time we had to put up our pup tent in the rain at the Indiana Dunes. Later, talking under flashlight inside the tent under the tapping of the rain with one of those big cans of Jay's Potato Chips between us and some Frosty's root beer or other favorite. Swinging on a rope swing attached to a tree and leaping off down the sand dune.

Scout meetings were on Friday evenings, and fairly often Bill and I had a pizza cheese - at Ray's Pizza on 75th Street, a legendary place in South Shore, before the meeting. Such simple, memorable things. The Troop met in the basement of South Shore Presbyterian Church on 76th near South Shore Drive.

An event still vivid in memory was the time during the first winter of high school, we were walking home from South Shore along 78th Street. The old apartment buildings were beautifully trimmed with snow frosting, and we started throwing snowballs at kids passing from behind some bushes.

That was when I met Pat Golden with her beautiful long dark braid swinging as she walked, her nappy dark blue coat, her knee socks, pink-tinged full cheeks, and carrying her books in front of her, as was the custom for girls then. I was stricken, and I had a crush on her right through high school, but I was quite a shy boy.

Bill later became close to Evelyn Mike Duffel (sp?), and they could be seen between classes walking together, bill's arm behind her, guiding, a very defining gesture of Bill's.

Bill lived at that time with his mom and dad in clapboard apartment building, which resembled a grand old private home, on South Shore Drive near 77th. The third floor. The back porch looked out into Rainbow Park. There are photos of the building on my site, Chuckman's Places at https://chuckmanplaces.wordpress.com/

https://chuckmanplaces.wordpress.com/2009/11/02/apartment-building-south-shore-drive-taken-october-11-1968-on-a-visit-rear-porches-in-foreground-just-out-of-frame-is-rainbow-park-a-john-chuckman-photo/

https://chuckmanplaces.wordpress.com/2009/11/02/apartment-building-south-shore-drive-i-believe-this-was-bill-hachmanns-building-his-family-had-the-top-floor-taken-october-11-1968-on-a-visit-a-john-chuckman-photo/

See also our 6B class picture. https://chuckmanplaces.wordpress.com/2009/11/02/chuckman-bradwell-class-picture-6b-1956-with-the-great-mr-walter-kazmier-standing-in/

Bill had a really decent side to him. In 1955, I was new to South Shore, and to Bradwell Elementary School, and I had a very unhappy experience with an insensitive home room teacher who had me stand up before the class and answer some questions about myself.

You see, my mom and dad were divorced, quite a rare thing in 1955, and just a reference to my father could send me into tears.

When she asked me about my father, I broke down and cried in front of the class. What a way to be introduced to your new school classmates.

Later, at recess, Bill and Preston Uney approached me in the schoolyard to make friends and make me feel better about what had happened. It would be hard to overstate how much I appreciated that gesture.

Once we were in high school, Bill and I drifted apart. I guess in part because he spent a lot of time with Mike, who often came over at lunchtime in the cafeteria to the table where Preston and I sat and joked around. She loved telling offbeat jokes. Through high school, I remained a good friend of Preston Uney's, who lived just south of 79th and Kingston with his mom and dad and two older sisters.

I see Bill lived in Western Michigan. I assume he taught there because I know he became a teacher. That coast was one of my favorite places on earth when I was in my forties. Giant sand dunes, peach orchards, lovely farms, and the dramatic beauty of Lake Michigan. I vacationed south of where he and his family lived many times. I hope he loved it as much as I did.
JOHN CHUCKMAN
February 13, 2020
Bill was my lifelong best friend, although distance separated us, I always thought of him.. He truly made me a better person. Complaining about his various maladies was not in his DNA. Bill was truly a GOOD person. I still think about our good times, he will not be forgotten. RIP to my best friend. Chris, you will always have my support. Bob

Bob Thill
Friend
June 2, 2018
Mr. Hachmann was my teacher 2 years in a row. He was such a nice man and I feel terrible that I was a rotten student. I wish I could tell him sorry -- I was a messed up kid back then. RIP Mr. Hachmann
S Depoy
April 3, 2018
Christine and family, I am so sorry for your loss. I just learned of Bill's passing. He was a great guy and I will miss him.
Penny Grimm
March 2, 2018
I was so sorry to read of Bill's passing. I went to school with him at South Shore High School in Chicago, but probably the last time I saw him was in 1965. He was one of my best friends at that time. I have thought of him over the years and was delighted to reconnect a bit over Facebook. I pray that the love of family and friends will support you and the love of Jesus surround you at this time.
"Mike" (Duffell) Mabry
Westminster, Colorado
February 25, 2018
Mr. Hachmann was such a kind man. He probably wouldn't even remember me as a student almost 25 years ago, but I've thought about him at various times throughout the years. I'm left with memories of his quiet, calm presence and his gentle spirit. I guess that's what great teachers do...leave their legacy in the still impressionable minds of their students for them to be remembered for many years after they leave the classroom. My only regret is that I know I never fully appreciated him or thanked him at the time. Rest in peace, Mr. Hachmann. Prayers are being lifted up for you and your family.
Anonymous
February 21, 2018
My condolences to your family,
I remember when Bill came aboard and his first years of teaching at Hile School,these are all good memories,helping with science trips to Chicago to the Science Museum,fish frys helping the PTA raise funds and adult gatherings at my home or in Brohman at a cottage.
He will be missed...
John
John Schaefer
February 21, 2018
Eric and Michelle, so sorry for your loss. Our thoughts and prayers are with you and you family during this time.
Matt Roosien
February 21, 2018
My condlences go out the the Hachmann Family. Just know that he made a wonderful impression on me while at South Shores Junior High. He was an excellent teacher.
All my sympathies,
Sheryl (Kasher) Voege
February 20, 2018
Bill was a true brother to me. I will miss him greatly.

Bob
Bob Thill
February 20, 2018
Diane Weenum
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