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1928 - 2018 Obituary Condolences
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October 23, 2018

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Preview Entry
October 23, 2018

Please don't submit copyrighted work; original poems, songs or prayers welcomed. Legacy.com reviews all Guest Book entries to ensure appropriate content. Our staff does not correct grammar or spelling.

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 Memories & Condolences
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March 2, 2018
Sometimes I think the greatest gift we can give someone is to remember him or her. Perhaps an even greater gift is to miss them. I am certain many people will remember Jim and many will miss him also. I remember him for a few things he taught me. Some are quite tangible like how to build a fire and how to crack ice with a spoon (hint put it in a thin towel so it doesn't go flying all over the place.) With regards to fires, I vividly remember the occasional pyromaniac saying one time, I sure know how to build em. Yes, you most certainly do, and I probably don't ever build a large fire without thinking of him. Other things he taught me are much less tangible how to be gracious when you probably are indignant, how to be stoic in the face of adversity, and how to love dogs. Of course, I could and probably should also curse him for the latter, since it seems like most nights I have one sleeping on or at least near my head and indeed they occasionally climb on my head thankfully it is not a golden retriever. But as I am sure Jim realized, at least with dogs you always have a living animal that will provide you with what at least feels like unconditional love in an otherwise unloving and unpredictable world. The pediatric oncologist lives in that nightmarish world of unpredictability. I remember he once told me he lived and died with every one of them (every patient). I understand the emotional toll that takes on an individual and would not choose to live it. For me it would be the equivalent of asking to live an incessant and unrelenting life of post-traumatic stress disorder, and that Jim chose to live this life is a testament to his spiritual strength, his fortitude, and his willingness to serve his fellow man. On the flip side, he had the pleasure in his life to see the miracles of modern medicine. One example would be having the pleasure of treating and turning what were once uniformly fatal diseases like Hodgkin's Lymphoma into conditions that are almost uniformly curable. To participate in that evolution should define and be a living testament of the service Jim provided to society.

That he also served his country as a Captain in the Navy is simply icing on the cake. It is unfortunate he never made the rank of Commodore I suspect that this was more a silly whim than a real desire but I do agree with him that the rank of Commodore sounds better than Captain. And I hope he found the solitude in the foothills of Virginia that he so desperately missed from his time at Pine Mountain Lake in California as a younger man. One thing that is certain, Jim truly was an officer and a gentleman and for that he will be missed.