Home > News & Advice > Culture & History > Famous Quotes: Martin Luther King Jr.

Famous Quotes: Martin Luther King Jr.

by Legacy Staff

Most Americans can quote at least part of Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech. But what about all the thousands of other wise, thoughtful observations the civil rights leader shared in speeches, books, and letters throughout the 1950s and 1960s? Here, in easily shareable photo form, are a few of Dr. King’s quotations that still ring true as we look at the world around half a century later. (Click on each image below to zoom in and share that quote.)

“Beyond Vietnam: A Time to Break Silence” (1967)

Getty Images / Robert W. Kelley

“He who accepts evil without protesting against it is really cooperating with it.” —Martin Luther King, Jr., “Beyond Vietnam: A Time to Break Silence” (1967)


“Letter from a Birmingham Jail” (1963)

Getty Images / Robert W. Kelley

“Freedom is never voluntarily given by the oppressor; it must be demanded by the oppressed.” —Martin Luther King, Jr., “Letter from a Birmingham Jail” (1963)

Advertisement


“Revolution of Values” (1967)

Library of Congress

“When machines and computers, profit motives and property rights are considered more important than people, the giant triplets of racism, extreme materialism, and militarism are incapable of being conquered.” —Martin Luther King, Jr., “Revolution of Values” (1967)


“Stride Toward Freedom: The Montgomery Story” (1958)

Library of Congress

“History will have to record that the greatest tragedy of this period of social transition was not the strident clamor of the bad people, but the appalling silence of the good people.” —Martin Luther King, Jr., “Stride Toward Freedom: The Montgomery Story” (1958)


“Letter from a Birmingham Jail” (1963)

Getty Images / Howard Sochurek

“We should never forget that everything Adolf Hitler did in Germany was ‘legal’… It was ‘illegal’ to aid and comfort a Jew in Hitler’s Germany.” —Martin Luther King, Jr., “Letter from a Birmingham Jail” (1963)


“Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community?” (1967)

Getty Images / Bettmann

“Returning violence for violence multiplies violence, adding deeper darkness to a night already devoid of stars… Hate cannot drive out hate: only love can do that.” —Martin Luther King, Jr., “Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community?” (1967)

More Stories

Advertisement