GLENN DOMAN

Obituary
  • "If you were alive today i would come and see you and let..."
    - brian brown
  • "Thank you, Glenn, for your focus and sacrifice in investing..."
    - Joan Colbert
  • "Thank you for being one of the most inspirational doctors..."
    - Michael Lingard
  • "An amazing and kind soul. Thank you!"
    - Jeffrey Kelly
  • "Thank you for helping all the children you did."
    - Kathy Thureen

DOMAN--Glenn. Glenn Doman, 93, founder of The Institutes for the Achievement of Human Potential, died on the 18th of May. Doman was world-renowned for his pioneering work with brain-injured children and well children. In 1940 he graduated from the University of Pennsylvania School of Physical Therapy. Study with Dr. Temple Fay at Temple University Hospital followed. On the day of the attack on Pearl Harbor, Doman enlisted and served as second Lt. Infantry Platoon Leader and Rifle Co. Commander in combat in Europe. He was decorated by George VI with the British Military Cross for outstanding heroism in action. From the U.S. he received the Distinguished Service Cross for extraordinary heroism in combat, the Silver Star for gallantry against an armed enemy, and the Bronze Star for heroism in close combat, and he was nominated for the Congressional Medal of Honor. He was decorated for services to the Duchy of Luxembourg during the Battle of the Bulge. Following his discharge, Doman began pioneering the field of child brain development. In 1955 he founded The Institutes for the Achievement of Human Potential with the goal of successfully treating the brain. Doman and Fay believed that the brain had great capacity for recovery. At that time brain-injured patients were routinely warehoused and considered hopeless. Doman insisted, "The brain grows by use." Today the concept of neuroplasticity embraces the work of The Institutes. In the early 1960s, the successful work with brain-injured children led to vital discoveries about the development of well children. Doman authored "The Gentle Revolution Series" for parents, the first of which was "How To Teach Your Baby To Read." Doman taught more than twenty-five thousand families, and he strongly influenced millions of families through the book "What To Do About Your Brain-Injured Child." In 1966 he was knighted by Brazil and received that country's highest decoration, the Knight Order of the Southern Cross. In 2007 he received the Medal of the Italian Senate. He is survived by his wife, children, and grandchildren. His daughter, Janet, and his younger son, Douglas, continue to lead his dedicated staff around the world, ensuring that children both hurt and well continue to get the help they need. Donations may be made to The Founder's Fund at The Institutes, 8801 Stenton Ave., Wyndmoor, PA 19038, or iahp.org.

Published in The New York Times on June 2, 2013
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