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Raymond Kaufman

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Kaufman
Dr. Raymond H. Kaufman , 85, died on Thursday, November 25, 2010, of injuries sustained in an automobile accident. He was surrounded by his loving family. He was born on November 24, 1925, in Brooklyn, New York, where he graduated from Erasmus High School. He earned his medical degree in 1948 from the University of Maryland Medical School and he completed his residency at Beth Israel Hospital in New York in 1953. After serving two years in the Air Force in Bryan, Texas, he came to The Methodist Hospital in Houston to complete his fellowship in Pathology and joined the faculty of Baylor College of Medicine in 1956. He served as Chairman of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology (ObGyn) for 23 years and remained at Baylor for 48 years as Professor in the Departments of ObGyn and Pathology. He became a certified Diplomate of the American Board of ObGyn in 1959 and was certified by the American Society of Cytology in 1967. At the time of his death, he was Professor Emeritus in the Department of ObGyn at Baylor College of Medicine and Professor of ObGyn at Weil Medical College of Cornell University.
Dr. Kaufman was an active member and officer of numerous professional and scientific societies, including President of the Houston ObGyn Society, the Texas Association of ObGyn, the Central Presidency of the Houston ObGyn Society, the Texas Association of ObGyn, and the International Society for the Study of Vulvovaginal Disease.
He published over 270 articles in the medical literature and authored the definitive textbook on vulvar and vaginal diseases entitled "Benign Diseases of the Vulva and Vagina." Dr. Kaufman's research has been continuously funded by the National Institutes of Health since 1972. In his clinical practice, he combined his expertise in pathology with his practice in gynecology to become one of the leading gynecologic pathologists in the world. He specialized in the treatment of vulvar diseases and lectured on his specialties throughout the world. He was active in on-going research into the effects of DES on the women whose mothers were given this drug during their pregnancies. Dr. Kaufman received many awards and honors throughout his career, most recently the prestigious John McGovern Compleat Physician Award in 2010. Perhaps his greatest legacy is his mentoring of hundreds of students, residents, and colleagues, and he has served as a guiding light to numerous others.
Dr. Kaufman faced numerous physical challenges throughout his life after contracting polio during the 1954 epidemic. His family and friends marveled at his incredibly positive spirit and his fierce strength and determination. His disabilities never slowed him down, but none of this would have happened without the constant, loving support of his wife, Pat. He traveled with Pat all over the world and they made friends everywhere they went. He will be profoundly missed by his family and their many wonderful friends in Houston and throughout the world.
He is survived by his loving wife of 64 years, Patricia Kaufman, and four daughters and their spouses: Susan and Edward Kahn of Houston, Wendy and Seth Katzman of San Francisco, Murri and Ray Simonetti of Asheville, and Elisabeth and David DeTone of London. In addition, he is survived by his loving grandchildren Jennifer Dunn-Kahn and partner Karin, Matthew Kahn and wife Samantha, Lauren Katzman, Molly Katzman, Dominick Simonetti, Zachary Simonetti, and great-grandson Bryce Dunn-Kahn.
Funeral services were held Friday, November 26. Honorary pallbearers were Marty Freedman, Leroy Leeds, and his sons-in-law Edward Kahn, Seth Katzman, Ray Simonetti, and David DeTone. Donations in his memory may be made to the Raymond H. Kaufman, M.D. and Patricia Ann Kaufman Endowed Chair in Obstetrics and Gynecology at Baylor College of Medicine, the Maimonides Society, or a charity of your choice.

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Published in Houston Chronicle from Nov. 26 to Nov. 28, 2010
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