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Gerald Jerome Tobias

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Gerald Jerome Tobias Obituary
July 6, 1926 - November 14, 2015 Gerald Jerome Tobias age 89, passed away on November 14, 2015 in Huntington Beach, CA after succumbing to a brave battle with Alzheimer's disease. Gerald was born in Winona, Minnesota to Arthur & Ruby Tobias. He always had a love of flying. He served in the Army Air Force at the tail end of WWII and started his journey into Aerospace by going to work for the Martin Company. He left there for the Boeing Co. in Seattle, WA in 1962 as Director of Operations for the original Plant #1 and later General Manager of the Turbine Division for the first 747 aircraft. In 1967 he received a Sloan Fellowship to Stanford University, being the first person to receive such an honor without an undergraduate degree. In 1971 he moved to San Diego, CA as Vice President of the Aerospace group for Rohr Industries. GJT left Rohr to become President of Sikorsky Aircraft a division of United Technologies. During his prolific tenure there he was responsible for the production of the Blackhawk combat and S-76 executive helicopters. He landed one of the largest military helicopter contracts ever and set a worlds record. He retired in 1981 and moved to Port Angeles, WA to enjoy his passion for fishing and boating. He came out of retirement to work for Rogerson Aircraft of Irvine, CA as President of Hiller Helicopter. He and his wife Barbra finally retired in Palm Desert, CA and enjoyed golfing and entertaining. Gerald was a man of great intellect, curiosity, opinions and held a deep love for his family. He lived life on his terms, traveled the world and caught some big fish! His wife Barbra predeceased him five years ago. His 5 children, Michelle, Michael, Toby, Robin, Cheri, 11 grandchildren, 7 great grandchildren and his brother Ben survive him. His favorite saying was "Onward and Upward!" Rest in peace GJT, you will be deeply missed.
Published in the Los Angeles Times from Nov. 25 to Nov. 27, 2015
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