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Lois May Davis

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Lois May Davis Obituary
Lois Davis, formerly of West Los Angeles, died on August 3rd, 2016 at the age of 89. She is survived by her four grandchildren, Jake, Zachary, Nina and Zoe, whom she loved with total abandon, and her two children and their spouses - daughter Susan Davis and Kevin Kiernan and son, John Davis and Jeffy Griffin. Ask anyone and they will tell you she loved and respected her kids completely. She also had the good fortune of forging life-long, remarkable friendships with remarkable people. She counted renowned artists, actors, musicians, politicians and, most importantly, activists as her friends and admirers. Lois was the first female student body president at SUNY Buffalo in 1947 and was named to "Who's Who on American Campuses" in 1948, before you paid to get your name listed. She had a career in social work and worked for over twenty years with Didi Hirsch Mental Health Services helping mentally ill homeless folks get back on their feet. She received Didi Hirsch's Social Worker of the year award in 2010 and finally retired in 2011 at the age of 83. At her core and in her heart, Lois Davis was a fierce, tireless and passionate advocate for peace and justice. It mattered not your race, nationality, sexual orientation or economic standing, Lois fought for your equality. In 1965, she co-founded the San Fernando Valley friends of the Black Panthers; great adventures for her neighbors in Woodland Hills when the Black Panthers met at their home. When the Watts riots erupted, Lois headed into the fray before being directed home. She was anti-war, anti-nuke, pro democratic socialism, and anti government military intervention in Chile, El Salvador, Nicaragua and elsewhere. For 30 years, she was the special events coordinator and a board member at Office of the Americas in Los Angeles working for peace and justice. Almost 20 years before the United States ended its embargo, Lois was part of a group that broke the travel ban to Cuba and was threatened with Federal Prosecution. At the age of 79, she was arrested for the first time in a labor and immigration demonstration that shut down a major Los Angeles boulevard and spent the night in jail. After being handcuffed to a bench without any food overnight, her only lament was, "They treated me like I was a criminal!" Lois Davis was creating 'The Bern' long before Senator Sanders was doing his thing. And she did it all in cashmere sweaters, pressed jeans and a single, beautiful strand of pearls.
Published in the Los Angeles Times from Aug. 18 to Aug. 28, 2016
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