Josephine Chuch Liu Yen

Obituary
  • "I met Josephine Yen thirty years ago. She never stopped..."
    - Richard Yan
  • "We were always encouraged by Andy and Josephine through..."
    - Woody and Laurie Lauer
  • "Dear Jennifer and family, I knew your dear grandparents..."
    - Linda Foh
  • "When Andy and Josephine could no longer attend worship..."
    - Rebecca Schnitzel
  • "My deepest condolences. I know from her granddaughter..."
    - Aaron Woolfolk

1923 - 2013
Artist Josephine Chuch Liu Yen (Zi), formerly of 502 Hunters Lane, Oreland, Pennsylvania, passed away on October 27, 2013, in Ithaca, New York. Mrs. Yen was born Jan. 10, 1923, in Shanghai, China, to Liu Pei Yue and Kuh Chong Sin. She came to the United States with her beloved husband, Andrew Yen, over 60 years ago. She was a kind and generous member of the Oreland community, beloved by all who knew her.

Josephine was born into a wonderful loving family with many sisters and brothers. She and her husband came to the United States in the 1940's, embraced this country and made it their home.

Josephine was the backbone of steel for her family, who she would love and care for all of her life. She was an artist, as well, making beautiful drawings, ceramics, paintings, and clothing. When her son got married, she made his wife custom fit fashionable clothing and when she had grandchildren, she made them clothes as well. Always fashionable, always things they were excited to wear.

In 2012, Josephine's husband, Andrew, passed away and she had to move to a new city that she wasn't familiar with. In spite of this, her first concern was for others, not herself. For example, she learned of a Burmese immigrant family in her community who wanted to teach their son piano but couldn't afford it. Josephine promptly arranged to donate her own piano to the family.

When she lost her husband, last year on May 29th, Josephine's heart broke. She dreamed of him every night. Every night, the same dream. She was in her old house in Pennsylvania and she would walk into the kitchen and there he would be and she would be amazed that he was alive. She would reach out and touch him and he would be warm. "But you are dead!" She would exclaim. "How can you be warm?" He would smile at her with a twinkle in his eye and assure her, "Oh yes, I am still warm." He has been waiting for her this past year, visiting her only in her dreams. Now, they are finally back together again.
Published on NYTimes.com from Nov. 1 to Nov. 2, 2013