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William Carroll King

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William Carroll King Obituary
1943 ~ 2019
William Carroll King, 76, beloved father and grandfather, died peacefully May 9, 2019 at his home in Salt Lake City of natural causes.
Survivors include his children, Michael Sean King and wife Robyn; and Kristin King and husband Greg Alt; ex-wife Sue Russell; brother John King and wife Janice, brother Richard King and wife Lynn, sister Kathy Gordon and husband Bruce, sister Barbara King; grandchildren Oliver and Megan; step-grandchildren, Lydia and Emily; ex-wife Connie King, daughter-in-law Margaret Korosec and husband, Matjaz, grandchildren-in-law Galen and Zala; the congregation at Kol Ami; and many relatives and friends.
Born Jan 9, 1943 to H. Venice Yergensen King and L. Carroll King, he grew up in Evanston, IL, with summers in Marysvale, UT at the Pines Hotel. After graduating from Evanston Township High School, he moved to Salt Lake City where he met his wife, Sue Russell. He graduated from the University of Utah and studied topology at the University of Utah Department of Mathematics Graduate School. He worked as a statistician (Salt Lake City), systems analyst at Manus Services (Seattle), and the data processing manager for Sweet Candy Company (Salt Lake City).
Bill led a full, busy, social life. He could often be found juggling with his daughter and the Wasatch Front Jugglers at Trolley Square on Sunday afternoons. He enjoyed reading, the piano, baseball games, the symphony, bridge, poker, and the game of Go. In later years he joined the synagogue community at Kol Ami, which became a second family to him. Family and friends miss him deeply.
A graveside service will be held May 16th at 11:00 a.m. at the B'Nai Israel Cemetery, with lunch at Dee's afterward (2104 S 700 E). Donations in his name can be made to Jewish Family Services, the YWCA, or the ACLU.
Published in Salt Lake Tribune on May 16, 2019
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