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George William Doyle

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George William Doyle Obituary
George William Doyle, 89 OCEANSIDE -- George William Doyle died Sunday, June 26, 2011 in Palomar Hospital after having lived a full and complete life. He was born in New York, N.Y., on January 19, 1922 to Charlotte Muriel (Tutt) and Willard James Clement Doyle. Doyle was accomplished, creative, and held several patents on machinery. He served as a Corporal in the U.S. Army Chemical Corps from 1943 to 1945. From 1946 to 1949, he attended the University of Rhode Island and graduated 16th in his class of 496 with a degree in Chemical Engineering. He then worked for NL Industries until recalled by the U. S. Army in 1950 when he served as a 1st Lieutenant. In 1952, he returned to NL Industries as a Research and Development Engineer until 1972, and then supervised a large plant in Salt Lake City until 1973. From 1973 and until his death, he was a businessman in Lawn Care and then in Real Estate. Doyle served as a volunteer leader in several organizations, including Palomar Unitarian Universalist Fellowship and a local affiliate of National Alliance on Mental Illness. He enjoyed tennis, bridge, camping, swimming, reading, traveling and following politics. Doyle was preceded in death by three wives, Cecile T. (Pigeon) whom he divorced in 1972, Doris E. (Read) in 1975, and Ann (Fitzgerald) earlier this year; and son, Ken in 2003. He is survived by Terry, Brian (Chris), and Michele (Adam Arnold) from his first marriage; Gerri McDonald and Marilyn (Mike) Bredimus from his third marriage; and grandchildren Chelsea, Emily, Jessica and David. The memorial service will be held at 2 p.m. on Saturday, July 16, at the Palomar Unitarian Universalist Fellowship in Vista. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the World Wildlife Fund. Sign the Guest Book online obits.nctimes.com

Published in The San Diego Union Tribune on July 10, 2011
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