Home
Resources
More Obituaries for James Duggar
Looking for an obituary for a different person with this name?

James Richard Duggar

Obituary Condolences

James Richard DUGGAR (Age 63) Jim passed away on September 18, 2010 at the Hospice of Kitsap County from complications following an injury sustained after a fall. Jim was born on April 4, 1947 in Seattle to James T. Duggar and Hazel Faye (Goodwin) Duggar. He lived in Southern California until the family returned to Seattle during his late teens. Jim graduated from the University of Washington in 1970 with a B.A. in Anthropology, and while there, he affiliated with the Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity. Through the 1969 until the mid 1970's, Jim was active with the Chief Seattle Council, Boy Scouts of America. During this time, Jim served in several leadership positions for the summer camp programs at Camp Omache and Camp Brinkley. Professionally, Jim was a certified Social Studies teacher and held credentials as a substance abuse counselor. The accomplishment that he was the most proud of was becoming a master gardener and operating his own business, JR Lawn & Landscaping Service, for many years. When injuries forced him to close his business, it was a very sad day for him. In his later years, he was a good neighbor and friend within his Ravenna/Bryant Park community. Until his final illness, Jim always enjoyed sitting down with a friend, having a cup of coffee and discussing a wide variety of interests. He was preceded in death by his parents. Jim is survived by his sister Monica Macdonnell, a niece, and several cousins. There will be a memorial service and celebration of life for Jim at the Evergreen-Washelli Cemetery chapel on Tuesday, April 12 at noon. A reception will be held after the service for friends and family to reflect on and share memories of their friend Jim. In lieu of flowers, please send memorials to Chief Seattle Council, Boy Scouts of America, 3120 Rainier Ave S., Seattle, WA 98144.
Published in The Seattle Times from Apr. 3 to Apr. 10, 2011
Read More
Give others a chance to express condolences. Not right now.