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GLENN MURRAY Jr.

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Glenn Richard Murray, Jr.
Born February 5, 1930 in Cincinnati, Ohio. Died August 7, 2012 in San Francisco, California. Mr. Murray graduated from Yale with a B.A. in 1951 and with a LL.B. from Harvard Law School in 1957, magna cum laude, where he was editor of the Harvard Law Review (1956-1957) and a Frederick Sheldon Travelling Fellow (Law, 1957-1958). In the U.S. Navy from 1951-1954 (Destroyers, Pacific), Mr. Murray was a First Lieutenant on board the U.S.S. Mason (D.D. 854) and a gunnery officer, senior watch officer and legal officer on the U.S.S. Cunningham (D.D. 752).
Mr. Murray was an associate at McCutchen, Doyle, Brown & Enersen in its San Francisco office from 1958-1963 and 1965-1967. He became a partner at McCutchen in 1967 until he retired in 1995. Mr. Murray was also a political-military analyst for the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs from 1963-1965, and a consultant on nuclear non-proliferation to the Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs from 1967-1968.
Mr. Murray was a member of the State Bar of California; Fellow, American College of Trial Lawyers; Early Neutral Evaluator, U.S. District Court, Northern District of California. He was also a member of the Bars of all District Courts of California, the Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, the U.S. Supreme Court and the U.S. Court of Federal Claims.
Mr. Murray's professional experience included general civil litigation with special expertise in natural resource, condemnation, and timber and real estate litigation. He handled a wide variety of civil litigation matters involving antitrust, general commercial, securities, real estate, condemnation, tax, probate, unfair competition, insurance, patent and trademark, corporate/partnership, environmental, mineral rights, banking, insolvency and municipal and public utility law. He litigated cases in the California Superior and Appellate Courts, all of the U.S. District Courts in California, the Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, the U.S. Claims Court, and the Supreme Court of the United States.
Among the more interesting of Mr. Murray's assignments was the Lockheed litigation where he represented the former Chairman and Vice-Chairman of Lockheed in litigation arising out of the Japanese extortion scandals in connection with the sale of the Lockheed 1011 aircraft to All Nippon Airways. Such litigation involved shareholders' derivative suits, foreign letters rogatory, and a suit by his clients against their directors' and officers' liability carrier. All such matters were satisfactorily resolved, and Mr. Murray's clients obtained judgment after a jury trial against the insurers for the largest punitive damages award yet entered against such an insurer.
Also of interest were two condemnation suits in which Mr. Murray represented Arcata Corporation in suits for just compensation for takings of timberlands for the creation and expansion of Redwood National Park. In the first such suit, Arcata was awarded the largest condemnation award in the history of the U.S. Claims Court. In the second, Arcata received total compensation exceeding $600 million for property valued by the government at about $100 million.
Mr. Murray was a political-military analyst for the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs and a consultant on nuclear non-proliferation to the Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs. He received his B.A. from Yale College and his LL.B. magna cum laude from Harvard Law School, where he was an editor of the Harvard Law Review, and a Frederick Sheldon fellow he was also a member of The Pacific - Union Club of San Francisco.
Richard is survived by his wife of 32 years, Deborah Cruzen Murray, of Ross, California. A small private ceremony celebrating his life has been held. Donations in his name may be made to the charity of your choie.

Published in San Francisco Chronicle on Aug. 24, 2012
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