William E. Cahill (11/06/1932 - 01/17/2011)

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  • "Candace - We are so sorry to hear of your Dad's passing. ..."
    - Pat & Randy Riffe
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    - Keely Vanacker
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Obituary


CAHILL,
William E.
(Age 78)

Passed away on January 17, 2011 in Sacred Heart Hospital, Spokane WA as a result of injuries received from a fall. He was born in Cheney, WA on November 6, 1932 to Claire and Georgie Cahill. He graduated from Central Valley High School, received a BA in Education from Eastern WA University and a MA in Music from San Jose State University. He served on active duty in the US Naval Reserve, attended the Naval School of Music at Anocosta Naval Station in WA D.C, served in the Unit Band at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, NY, and was honorably discharged.
He is survived by two children, Candace and Brennan, two stepchildren, Kim King and Paul Clampitt, and by 16 grandchildren and 12 great-grandchildren. Preceding him in death was his wife of 44 years, Fritzi, and sons Michael and Timothy.
Bill taught music in Goldendale, WA, Evergreen H.S. and Cascade J.H.S. in King County, WA, Greenacres J.H.S. and Central Valley elementary schools. As hobbies, he and his wife were active in Spokane Civic Theater, Valley Rep. Theater, and Rogue Players, participating in over 40 plays and musicals often together. Highlights of his time in the US Navy were marching with the Navy band in the inaugural parade for Eisenhower, and playing in "pick-up" jazz bands.
A Celebration of his life will be held Sunday, February 20, 2011 at 4:00 p.m. at the Old European Restaurant, 7640 N. Division, Spokane, WA. A reception to follow. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be given in Bill's name to the Disabled American Veterans or WA State Democrats.

Published in Spokesman-Review from Jan. 23 to Jan. 24, 2011
bullet U.S. Navy
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