Earl QUENNEVILLE
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QUENNEVILLE, Earl A. Architect, artist, and engineer Earl A. Quenneville died peacefully at his home in Tampa July 9, 2020 with his soulmate and partner of 42 years, Bobbie O'Brien-Quenneville, at his side. Earl was 92. Earlier that day, Earl visited the nearby Bayshore, where he once again felt the salty sea breeze that shaped so much of life and career. Much of Earl's architectural work focused on the waterfront. He designed the St. Croix By the Sea Hotel and Condominiums in the U.S. Virgin Islands, the Howard Johnson Beach Hotel and 440 West Beach Condo in Clearwater, and marinas in Tierra Verdi, Cocoa Beach and Punta Gorda, Fla. Earl also served two decades as ship's architect for the American Victory Ship Museum and Mariner's Memorial in Tampa. Earl was born in Fairview, MA. He and his mother Irene moved frequently, following his father Rene, a career Army officer. Having grown up on military bases, Earl worried about missing the fight in World War II, so he convinced his father to let him join the Navy at age 17. He was still in training in 1945 when the war ended. Earl spent four years as an electrician's mate aboard the USS Nespelen AOG-55 in the North Atlantic, earning the WWII Victory Medal. Earl attended Yale University, earning a bachelor's degree in civil engineering (1953), before he was called back into service by the Navy during the Korean War. He served as Chief Engineer on the USS Tills and was issued the National Defense Service Medal. The GI Bill allowed Earl to return to Yale for a second time, where he earned a bachelor's and master of architecture (1959) under the tutelage of Paul Rudolph, father of the Sarasota School of Design. Influenced by Rudolph, warmer weather and his love of sailing, Earl moved to Tampa joining the architectural firm of design legend Mark Hampton. Earl held professional architectural registrations with the NCARB (National Council of Architectural Registration Boards), Florida, Georgia, and the US Virgin Islands. He served as secretary and executive director of the American Institute of Architects, US Virgin Islands Chapter, and won a National Society of American Registered Architects design award in 1980 with architect Ken Purdy. Fiercely competitive, Earl sailed on Harold Balcom's three-man crew that finished second in the North American Sailing Championship Mallory Cup in 1965. In the 1970s, Earl and his architectural partners Gordon Johnson and D.A. Williams competed in IMSA, the International Motor Sports Association. Along with his engineer's logic and architect's sense of structural integrity, Earl had the soul of an artist. At Yale, famous colorist Josef Albers was his art instructor and asked to keep one of Earl's paintings for his personal collection. It was later willed to the permanent collection at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York and can be viewed with an appointment. Earl's paintings also graced his annual Christmas cards, which he shared with friends, family, and people he admired. Rosalynn Carter was so moved, she twice wrote to thank Earl for both his artwork and his holiday message. In later years, Earl devoted much of his time to the American Victory Ship. He was part of the original "Shanghai Crew" of volunteers who brought the memorial to Tampa's waterfront more than 20 years ago. He played various roles in the organization that runs the museum, including chairman, though he stopped keeping track of his volunteer time five years ago, when the non-billable hours topped 12,000. In addition to his grateful wife Bobbie, Earl is survived by sons, Kenneth, Marc, and Stephen; grandchildren who gave him much joy, Daniel Goodwin, Genevieve and Ariel Quenneville; and great-grandson, Daegan Goodwin. Earl will be interred at Arlington National Cemetery. A memorial will be held in Tampa at a later date. Donations in Earl Quenneville's memory can be made to the American Victory Ship Museum, 705 Channelside Drive, Tampa, FL 33602.

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Published in Tampa Bay Times from Jul. 26 to Jul. 28, 2020.
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117 entries
September 28, 2020
Earl volunteered so much time in his later years to the American Victory Ship. He relished the challenge of rendering drawings for the historic vessel and working on projects to make her more "public friendly." And he loved the men and women who volunteered with him. They were his true mates. Anyone who knew Earl, knew his favorite attire was his gray, AMVIC T-shirt with the word CREW over the front pocket. But he would wear the more formal polo shirt with the AMVIC logo for important meetings ... like the one with President Bill Kuzmick earlier this year on Earl's solar project proposal.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
September 26, 2020
Earl was so excited when we stopped in New Orleans on our way to visit the grandkids in Texas. We would check out his old haunts from the early 1940s when he lived there. The Army had transferred his father to New Orleans. That meant Earl spent his teenage years growing up on the bayous, learning to drive in the French Quarter and playing basketball with his friend Anthony Terranova. Anthony's parents ran a grocery store on Esplanade Avenue. We stopped at the store on a whim - during one of our trips - hoping to track down his friend. Anthony was retired, but he just happened to be at the store because he'd come to cut meat. Here Earl and Anthony pose at the Terranova Grocery meat counter. It was a sweet reunion for them both not having seen each other since WWII.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
September 25, 2020
The first meal Earl ever made me was crepes. I couldn't believe my good fortune, not only did I have a partner who made me dinner, but he could cook French cuisine. He also was my taste-tester when making the French Canadian holiday meat pie - tourtiere. But I remember most fondly his egg sandwiches. Fried up with a busted yolk and served on soft buttered bread. It was another of his specialties served when I worked late or was too tired to cook. It's what his parents would make him when time and budget were short. Such a simple meal but made with so much love and it holds such strong memories.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
September 23, 2020
Some of my favorite moments with Earl came after a long day at work. I'd arrive home and he'd already have a glass of wine poured for us. We would sit and sip and talk about our day. He was the best listener and gave the best advice. The photo is from our visit a Tuscan winery during our Italy trip when we both developed a taste for good chianti.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
September 22, 2020
Earl was so proud to be able to introduce his granddaughters to their Great Grandmother Irene. This photo spans four generations.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
September 21, 2020
Earl loved his architectural partners Gordon Johnson and D.A. Williams. In the mid-1970s, they shared an architectural practice and racing a jointly owned sports car. Here Earl sits in their "dinged up" Austin Healey. Earning his IMSA license made Earl a safer driver. And he was still an excellent driver when at 90 he personally decided to give up his driver's license. He was still a safe driver but he didn't want to take any chances that he couldn't react fast enough to a bad driver on the public roads. He always thought of others first.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
September 19, 2020
The American Victory Ship's annual cruise was a source of pride and joy for Earl and all her volunteers as well as a source of revenue. In this photo, Earl volunteered to "man" the forward gun during a "fly by" re-enactment.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
September 18, 2020
It was important to Earl that our grandchildren be introduced to the classics and theater. He wanted them to know what it was like to sit in a huge theater and be surrounded by music and spectacle. In this Christmas photo, we are at the Tampa Bay Performing Arts Theater where we took the family to watch "The Nutcracker" performed by a Russian ballet troupe on ice skates.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
September 16, 2020
One of my favorite photographs of Earl and Genevieve. It captures how symbiotic they were - not sure what they're looking at - but the picture captures how they share the same interest and intensity.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
September 15, 2020
Earl loved sharing our holiday table with family, friends and even strangers especially if they didn't have a place to celebrate Christmas or New Years. Here we are joined by our godson and nephew Sean in 2019. But we almost welcomed five student basketball players from Eastern Europe who I invited. I had met them at the grocery store two days earlier. They were stuck at University of Tampa dorm for the holiday because it was too expensive to fly home for the winter break. Even though they didn't accept our invitation, I knew that Earl would have delighted hosting them. He had a generous heart.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
September 14, 2020
Earl was an excellent dancer, but it was not his favorite activity. Yet during our trip to Italy, one of our dinners was held at a venue with a dance floor and musicians. So Earl obliged not just for me. He danced with several of the unaccompanied women on the tour. What I would give to have one more dance in the arms of my sweet Earl.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
September 13, 2020
It's difficult to describe the rush of excitement, the sheer reverence and privilege Earl and I felt, together, as we gained access to the roof of Milan's Duomo. It was Earl's favorite memory of our trip to Italy - being able to stroll under the flying buttress arches of that magnificent cathedral. He was an architect in the shadows of great architects, masons, builders and craftsmen who had gone before. We were surely blessed that day and during that entire trip.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
September 11, 2020
Art was at Earl's very core - his life force. So it was natural that he share that essence with his granddaughter Genevieve. He presented her with an easel when just 3 years old and loved taking her and her sister and brother to art museums.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
September 10, 2020
Climate change was a major concern and cause for Earl, especially for his grandchildren. As an architect and engineer, his goal was "net zero" design for the American Victory Ship and other projects in the past decade. Here he reads "Yes is More" on the design concepts of architect Bjarke Ingels. Earl was always challenging himself to learn and do better.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
September 9, 2020
Earl was the best at "talking like a pirate" "Argh! Me Matey" I was lucky to be his mate for 42 years. Pip also shared his pirate fun with grandson Daniel when he played a pirate in a production of Peter Pan.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
September 8, 2020
Earl (right) and his eldest son, Ken (left), doing their best "He-Man" impression for the camera. One of Earl's best qualities was his playfulness and willingness to joke around no matter his age. His three sons were so lucky to have a dad who was a playmate for life.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
September 7, 2020
Earl's sand castle on a Panama beach - always building something - he was destined to become an engineer and architect.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
September 7, 2020
Beautiful Irene poses for the camera while Earl starts building his sand castle. (late 1940s)
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
September 7, 2020
Earl got an extended leave while still enlisted in the Navy which he spent visiting his mother and father, a US Army officer, stationed in Panama at the end of WWII. Here Earl poses on a Panama beach where he spent the day with his mother, Irene, swimming and building sand castles.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
September 6, 2020
Earl is why I learned to swim free-style after the age of 40. Despite my age, he encouraged me, gave me swimming tips and was never embarrassed no matter how awkward I looked. Earl swam on junior varsity at Yale. Even at 91, Earl had a smooth, beautiful stroke and was the most patient and loving swim coach.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
September 5, 2020
We were not a couple given to dressing up and going out. But there were a few occasions like this photo from a Tampa Bay Society of Professional Journalists awards banquet in the early 1990s. It reminds me of when I had a particularly rough day at work. I arrived home to find Earl had covered our hallway wall - hanging up all my journalism awards. He always told me of how proud he was, but he also showed that pride with acts of faith and a lifetime of love.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
September 4, 2020
The silhouette a butterfly and grasshopper are part of an insect mobile Earl created for Genny's first Christmas present. He wanted to familiarize his first granddaughter with insects so she grew up curious and not afraid of bugs. Earl only knew what it was like raising boys, having a little girl in the family was a new and wondrous experience for him.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
September 3, 2020
Earl not only designed but helped build a two-story playhouse for his grandchildren. It was a labor of love shared with his oldest son, Ken. One of Earl's enduring memories was his small granddaughters wanting to help. One day, on their own, they gathered the smaller pieces of wood and stacked them up trying to help. It was a family project that bridged three generations.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
September 2, 2020
Able to handle a squirming toddler (Ariel), a melting ice cream cone and still manage a smile for the camera. Pip Earl was the best of us.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
September 1, 2020
Better than any alarm clock - Earl loved to start his morning snuggling with his granddaughters.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
September 1, 2020
Earl cherished visits with our grandkids. He loved pretending to still be asleep and have Genny and Ariel sneak in to wake him. "Surprise!" They would shout, jump onto the bed and shower their Pip with hugs and kisses. It became a sacred ritual, a bond between them. The laughter and love generated in those mornings is so powerful - to this day - it surrounds us and helps ease our sorrow.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
August 31, 2020
They shared a love of Earl's oldest son, Ken, a childlike sense of adventure and a mutual avoidance of vegetables, especially if green. Earl and daughter-in-law Lois were best pals. They formed their own "green veggie club" where they determined which green foods could qualify as vegetables. Their first nomination was key lime pie which remained a favorite food of both. For Earl, Lois was the daughter he never had and he could not have loved her more.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
August 30, 2020
When Earl met his great grandson, their connection was immediate and golden. Daegan was just over 9 months old and Earl was 90 - yet the two bonded and shared such joy during that visit in March 2019.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
August 29, 2020
Earl was not the typical Yale undergraduate (1949-53). He was a WWII veteran which made him not only seasoned but older than his classmates. He also came from a family of modest means - despite being a "legacy." Earl's father earned his engineering degree because of an insightful commanding officer who saw Rene's promise while stationed in New Haven after WWI. They both valued education above all else saying "Knowledge (unlike material things) can never be taken from you."
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
August 28, 2020
Sunday brunch was a weekly tradition with Earl's parents. And we were lucky we had it for our first seven years together. It was rare to miss a weekend. Earl loved and cared for his parents as they eased into their later years. It was a privilege - he would say. I agree. It was an opportunity to share old and new stories around the dining table. We would laugh - share sorrows - and embrace our time together. I learned to play bridge and heard Rene's "shaggy dog" jokes. I was immediately a member of the Quenneville clan - welcomed and loved. Irene started a scrapbook chronicling my newspaper articles that I would bring her. What a loving gesture, just like Rene tracking down a modern version of the Lincoln Library as a gift for my birthday. Thank you Earl for surrounding me with such love from you and your parents, it will help me survive this new life because your love endures.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
August 27, 2020
A true artist to his core - Earl painted the iconic Motif Number 1 when he was younger. It's the red fishing shack in the background and the wharf in this photo from Rockport, Mass. The scene is known as the most painted by art students in America. Earl taught me so much about art, but I had so much more to learn.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
August 26, 2020
Earl, on the lower left in the photo, and his US Navy buddies who went through training together at Great Lakes in 1945. Their friendship was so close that- they all returned after a night of drinking with same tattoo - a fouled anchor. Earl's strongest memory was the next morning waking up with dried blood and toilet paper stuck to his tattoo - and it was more painful to pull off than getting the tattoo. He convinced his buddies to apply for service on a light cruiser, that's what Earl wanted. However, he was targeted for an additional training as a gyro technician. So his buddies all got light cruisers, and Earl ended up on an AOG - a Navy ship that delivered aviation fuel to military bases in the North Atlantic.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
August 25, 2020
Earl designed a massive mixed-use residential community - Wildcat Run - around an Arnold Palmer designed golf course in Fort Myers. The golf course was built, but unfortunately, the condominiums, townhomes and residential homes Earl designed were not constructed. Such is the life of an architect, yet, Earl remained positive to the end of his career and ready to tackle a new project. The world was a better place with him here. Earl, Bobbie Quenneville and Arnold Palmer, golfer and course designer.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
August 24, 2020
Earl,12, loved his Boy Scout summer camp. But it was his Uncle Peter who he credits with teaching him how to fish and hunt.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
August 24, 2020
I am very late in expressing in public my gratitude for having the chance to be Earl’s daughter-in-law. I have two excuses for my late entry: 1) I am the world’s worst procrastinator and seem to only get things done the minute before it is quite too late. And 2) I have a very hard time dealing with death. I mostly just get mad at the loved one who had the audacity to die and go off and leave me. It is a great comfort to know that we shall all meet up again on the other side, and then I can give him a piece of my mind.
I met Earl and Bobbie 24 years ago when his son, Ken, brought me home to “meet the folks”. I could only imagine what might have been going through their minds, considering Ken and I had only met 4 months previously and were on our way to the tip of Florida to go get married by Captain Bob’s wife on a sunset cruise in Key West. But if they had any qualms, they kept those to themselves and greeted me with open arms, hearts and minds. I was immediately made part of the family, even before the marriage papers were signed! And best of all, they became instantly the Best Grandparents Ever to my son, Daniel who was 6 years old at the time. As we lived in Texas and they lived in Florida, visits with Mim and Pip (French for grandma and grandpa) were precious, and the visits only increased in value as the granddaughters, Genny and Ariel, made their appearance over the next three years.
There is not enough time, or room on this entry, for me to relay all the wonderful adventures we had as a family. Let’s just put it this way, we never experienced a dull moment. And there was so much laughter! I didn’t know that life could be so funny!
Most of my adventures with Earl revolved around the kids -you couldn’t do otherwise, as the children would invariably attach themselves to him physically as soon as he came into sight. Even as adults, the kids would gravitate toward Pip and spend their time basically in orbit of that celestial being. But there was one time when I had him all to myself, and man, THAT was fun!
The circumstances around that visit didn’t seem to appear to offer up much promise of fun. Bobbie was going into the hospital for a procedure and would be laid up for a couple of days and I had been invited to keep Earl company and act as a medical interpreter (I speak Doctor) for everyone. Well, of course, Earl and I were concerned for Bobbie, but once it was obvious that she was in the clear and recovering nicely, party time was on! One day we drove to the beach to eat delicious Grouper sandwiches and people watch. Another day we took a stroll in old Tampa, and ended up eating yummy Indian food on a sidewalk table under a beautiful Florida sky. Bobbie, in her infinite wisdom had arranged for friends to bring meals to the house, because my reputation as a substandard cook is well known through most of the south and central United States. Which brings me to one of the highlights of the visit. One of Bobbie’s friends, bless her, brought a wonderful meal over for Earl and me, and although I don’t remember what the entrée was, I remember the dessert. Key Lime Pie.
We had promised Bobbie that we would take care of ourselves, exercise and eat right while she was unable to supervise us. That meant eating our vegetables and being reasonable. Well, Earl and I took one look at that fabulous green pie and decided, by virtue of its coloring, that it fell into the dessert AND vegetable categories. And we thought Bobbie wouldn’t mind us having two helpings of veggies, so it didn’t take long before that big ol’ pie was history. Such fun! We had finally found a green vegetable we liked! From then on, Earl and I were special Key Lime Pie Buddies.
So here’s to you, Earl, wherever you are. Hoping that you are sailing a fine sea, with a cool breeze to your back and a piece of Key Lime in your free hand. Love ya!
Lois Quenneville
Family
August 23, 2020
On a sailboat or in life, I was always safe with Earl at the helm. I am now and forever Earl's first mate.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
August 22, 2020
In loving memory of a wonderful Friend. Earl was a very intelligent warm person. I enjoyed the time we spent together on many projects aboard the American Victory Memorial and Museum Ship. He designed and his son Marc and I installed most of the lighting systems for ships holds 1,2,3,4 & 5. I loved working with Earl and Late Cool Bill Simmons on many Air Conditioning projects aboard. I remember Bill teaching Earl how AC Plenums functioned. Although Earl was a licensed ME he was never too old to learn something. Earl I love you and will miss you. Mike Reynard
Mike Reynard
Friend
August 22, 2020
Holding, loving and playing with our grandchildren was sheer joy for Earl --- Here Ariel reflects that happiness back to him. When we visited, Earl and I would go to sleep sharing stories about the funny things the kids had said that day and when they got older, we would talk about their possibilities and futures. They now carry their Pip's kindness and joy forward.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
August 21, 2020
Earl loved me unconditionally of this I am certain. He knew no other way because his parents loved him with no reservation, no conditions. Earl did not have to earn their love - it existed without question. And Earl returned that unconditional love to all in his life. It is a love that can not be measured because it is infinite. Earl, at age 3, with his parents Irene and Rene.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
August 20, 2020
The gang of St. Croix architects in the 1960s, Earl (say no evil), Frank Prince (hear no evil) and Frank Blaydon (see no evil). This was one of Earl's favorite photos. It showed talented designers who were equally fun-loving. It reminded him of all the laughter they shared.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
August 19, 2020
Earl,17, in his skivvies aboard the USS Nespelen where - when not on watch - he could be found with his nose in a book. He - like his father - valued education above all else. And Earl kept his promise to his dad by earning his GED while enlisted. That was the condition for his father allowing Earl to join the Navy during WWII without finishing high school. When word came through to his captain that Earl had passed his GED tests - the captain called the entire crew on deck to announce it and commend Earl. Later, Earl said he took a ration of kidding from his shipmates, but they also respected him for his constant studies. They had a nickname for him "book worm" or "professor" or something like that, but unfortunately I don't recall it at this time.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
August 18, 2020
Playing with color was a never ending endeavor for Earl. So much of that came from his art classes with Josef Albers at Yale. It led Earl to experiment with color in his architecture as well as his art. Even more so, he shared that playfulness and those color lessons with our grandchildren. So, Josef Albers and Earl both live on through their art, their shared knowledge and their joy of creativity.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
August 17, 2020
Earl was so wise. He would engage our grandchildren challenging them to be kind, thoughtful and truthful. He rarely raised his voice. Instead, he would discipline with reason and logic no matter their age. Here he is pictured with Genny in one of their countless, serious conversations that almost always ended with a giggle and hug.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
August 16, 2020
Sitting in the copilot's seat was a cherish spot for Earl when he was with friends or his son Ken as pilots. Earl would have loved to earn a pilot's license but he worried he could not handle the radio static due to his impaired hearing. He'd spent too many years below deck in a noisy engine room with the US Navy. But he never went to the VA for hearing aids. He would say he could afford to pay for his own and preferred not using veterans benefits that could go to others who may not be able to afford their care. That is not unusual - sacrificing for a shipmate - yet it is another example that shows Earl was a man of such integrity.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
August 15, 2020
One of my earliest memories of Earl was watching him greet his son Marc - with a hug and kiss on the his cheek. I had never witnessed a grown man show such physical affection for his adult son. Then I met Rene, Earl's father, and saw it was not just a French tradition but a family bond. How blessed I was to live wrapped in so much unconditional love. Pictured here sons Ken, Marc, Earl and Stephen.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
August 14, 2020
Earl and Irene were more than son and mother, they were buddies as they moved from military base to military base, always the new family on the block. Irene created a home that was joyful, warm and wondrous in addition to being a marvelous mother where every day was an adventure. So Earl developed into the most fun, respectful, gentle, thoughtful and loving partner. The notion that Earl and Irene are reunited now - lessens the sorrow of living without him. I am forever thankful to have had both Earl and Irene in my life.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
August 13, 2020
As a US Navy veteran and spouse of a Carter Fellow (2010-2011), Earl was given a personal tour of the Carter Center Library in Atlanta. Here he poses in the replica of President Carter's Oval Office. That same trip, Earl attended President and Mrs. Carter's annual town hall. And on his way out of the auditorium, President Carter stopped and shook Earl's hand. It was the only stop the president made as he left. I'm not sure if he knew Earl was married to a Fellow, but I am almost certain President Carter recognized another WWII veteran. My only regret, I was too slow with my camera to capture the moment. That didn't matter to Earl. He didn't have to have "proof." He was happy just to have had the honor to shake President Carter's hand and be acknowledged by another WWII veteran.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
August 12, 2020
What made Earl such a natural teacher is that he always made it fun. Here he is in the statuary garden at the St. Petersburg Museum of Fine Arts. He created the game for our granddaughters to not just look at the sculptures - instead - become the sculpture. That or he was having a "Dance Fever" moment. One thing for certain - we were all had planting of laughs and learned at the same time.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
August 12, 2020
Forever my problem-solver! Earl had the most incredible mind. He embraced solving complex conundrums or simple issues like not having enough light to read his morning paper. And he always did it with a smile.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
August 11, 2020
Of all his roles, Earl cherished meeting, talking with and mentoring our nieces and nephews, great niece (Jillian pictured here), grandchildren, my work colleagues and interns. He had so much to share but equally learned and listened to them. I mean how many great grandfathers do you know who texted daily and knew how to twerk? The second part was TMI for our granddaughters, LOL.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
August 10, 2020
Group of 10 Memorial Trees
Plant Memorial Trees
Sympathy Gift courtesy of
Aubrey Haudricourt
August 10, 2020
Earl had a deep appreciation of history and especially for the people who sacrificed in times of crisis. He instantly identified with my father when he learned my dad joined the US Navy and was on the beaches of Normandy on D-Day. Earl's most prized book (pictured here) was his Uncle Pete's "scrapbook/journal" covering the history of the US Navy and the history of their family's military service.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
August 8, 2020
Patience was one of Earl's greatest qualities especially when explaining an engineering principle or art theory to a novice. Only one thing tested his patience - it was sitting still for hair cuts. It started when he was a child with "better things to do like play outside." He'd have to sit still for his grandfather who would use hand clippers that pulled while trimming his curly locks. As an adult, it wasn't unusual for Earl to delay getting sheared. So, I learned how to cut his hair. I don't know that I was faster than a professional stylist but we shared plenty of laughs during the task. And he'd always put me at ease saying "don't worry if you make a mistake, it'll grow back." It made me love him more with each haircut, with every new day.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
August 7, 2020
Growing up, Earl learned to read using the children's classic literature set, "Journeys Through Bookland." He loved "Treasure Island." Later in life, he shared his love of reading with his granddaughters. "Hop on Pop" was a favorite which Genny quickly translated into "Sit on Pip." We both shared a love of books, reading and learning that continued to his final day.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
August 7, 2020
I originally met Earl as a parent of 3 handsome son's in St. Croix US Virgin Islands in the 1960's. His middle son Marc and I were in the same class together. Over the years, I heard stories of Earl, his wife Bobbie and son Kenny from my childhood friend, Aubrey. Then around 2015 as an older adult myself, I was honored to meet Earl again and his amazing wife Bobbie at a party hosted by my friend Aubrey and his girlfriend, Alex in Clearwater, FL
My fondest memory of Earl, is helping celebrate his 90th birthday party and reuniting with his son's Kenny and Steve. Being in Earl and Bobbie's home, sharing the delicious meal Bobbie prepared, surrounded by their life together, their stories and artwork was so very, very special. What an honor it was to share in Earl's 90 yr milestone in life.
May he rest in peace, knowing the footprints he has left, how much he was loved and how deeply he will be missed. Lisa (Catanach) Newkirk-Svarczkopf
Lisa (Catanach) Newkirk-Svarczkopf
Friend
August 6, 2020
My sincerest condolences to your family for the loss of your loved one, Please except my deepest sympathies.
Simone Taylor
August 6, 2020
After I retired, one of my many perks was being home when Earl came downstairs in the morning. He was the happiest person I've ever known. He would descend the stairs humming or singing - usually a made up tune or ditty - but he always had a song in his heart. He would smile and hug me. I know we never had a day where he didn't give me at least one hug. He still has his arms around my heart - may he never let go.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
August 6, 2020
Earl and son Steve, enjoying a day sailing the Tornado, circa 1980.
Kenneth Bruce Quenneville MD
Son
August 6, 2020
Christmas with the Furry Freak Brothers and patriarch, circa 1972. From left to right, sons Ken, Steve and Marc, and Earl
Kenneth Bruce Quenneville MD
Son
August 6, 2020
1970's. From left to right, son Steve, son Ken giving the power sign, Earl (note the groovy synthetic shirt with the over sized pointed collar and the chest hair), Marc's girlfriend (?), son Marc and mother Irene (who is not so sure about her hippie grandson).
Kenneth Bruce Quenneville MD
Son
August 6, 2020
About 1964, Tampa, Florida. From left to right son Ken, son Marc, Earl, son Steve and good friend
Dick Mason.
Kenneth Bruce Quenneville MD
Son
August 6, 2020
Earl with son Steve on a beach in Massachusetts.
Kenneth Bruce Quenneville MD
Son
August 6, 2020
The house in St. Croix Earl built for his family.
Kenneth Bruce Quenneville MD
Son
August 6, 2020
St. Croix, USVI. Party at a high house with best friend D.A. Williams, also an Architect.
Kenneth Bruce Quenneville MD
Son
August 6, 2020
About 1966, recently arrived on St. Croix, USVI. From left to right, son Ken, Earl, son Steve, father Rene, son Marc and mother Irene.
Kenneth Bruce Quenneville MD
Son
August 6, 2020
About 2010. Taking his grand daughter's (I'm sure Bobbie is taking the picture) out for a bite in Tampa. Left to right, Ariel, Genny and Earl.
Kenneth Bruce Quenneville MD
Son
August 6, 2020
1970's! Ahhhh, the days of thin bodies. To bad about the funny-looking poodle perm, Dad. From left to right, Rene (Earl's father), Irene (Earl's mother), Earl and son Ken.
Kenneth Bruce Quenneville MD
Son
August 6, 2020
About 2008, Memphis Missouri with son Ken's family. Next to Earl is grand daughter Genny, followed by a thoughtful Ariel. I think the cat is quite taken by Earl. What a feline look of great admiration.
Kenneth Bruce Quenneville MD
Son
August 6, 2020
About 2010 in Missouri, where son Ken and family migrated. From left to right, Daughter-in-law Lois (bearer of grand daughters Genny and Ariel), son Ken, and Earl.
Kenneth Bruce Quenneville MD
Son
August 6, 2020
Brother Marc's High School Graduation. No grey hairs in the 1970's in this family! (Yet) From left to right, sons Steve, Ken and Marc, then Earl, the Patriarch.
Kenneth Bruce Quenneville MD
Son
August 6, 2020
Doesn't Earl look handsome in a suit? Holding 2 year old son Marc, also pretty happy about being on an adventure. 1950's.
Kenneth Bruce Quenneville MD
Son
August 6, 2020
Student housing for Earl and family while at Yale, in New Haven, Connecticut. Earl is driving the Vespa, followed by sons Steve, Marc and Ken. I don't know the officer.
Kenneth Bruce Quenneville MD
Son
August 6, 2020
These were Dad's "perm" or "poodle" days that I'm sure he'd like to forget (sorry Dad). Mid 1980's. Earl's beloved Triumph TR6 is in the background. Marc (second son) is kneeling in front. From left to right, Ken (son), Bobbie (wife), Earl (the Master) and Steve (3rd son).
Kenneth Bruce Quenneville MD
Son
August 6, 2020
Earl with his young graduates from University of South Florida, 1981. Ken (son) on left, Bobbie (wife) on right.
Kenneth Bruce Quenneville MD
Son
August 6, 2020
Father and son (Earl and Ken), in Galveston, Texas, about 1982. We were actually aboard a D Class Destroyer, similar to the one Earl served on in WW 2, if I'm not mistaken. The ship is on display at Wolf Park, along with a submarine. Old relics, ya gotta love em.
Kenneth Bruce Quenneville MD
Son
August 6, 2020
Can you feel the love in that fatherly gaze? Six month old me (Ken) is the lucky recipient, and that remained so for 66 years, with it likely continuing from Heaven right now.
Kenneth Bruce Quenneville MD
Son
August 6, 2020
Earl, 5 years old. How long do you think those cloths stayed white? Quick, take a picture!
Kenneth Bruce Quenneville MD
Son
August 6, 2020
Earl, 5 years old. His destiny as a sailor was ordained.
Kenneth Bruce Quenneville MD
Son
August 6, 2020
In addition to following the edict "Ye who cooketh shall not doeth the dishes", which left Bobbie's hands out of the sink (no debate who was the better cook), Earl also had no concept of "woman's work" or "men's work"... it was just work, and fairly dispensed. Already confident in his studly reality, what use had he for false pride?
Kenneth Bruce Quenneville MD
Son
August 6, 2020
Just one of many selfless trips to Texas to build memories with the grand kids, about 2010. Earl and Bobbie's arrival was always fondly anticipated.
Kenneth Bruce Quenneville MD
Son
August 6, 2020
Bobbie was a Master Birthday Planner. Just one such adventure is documented here. Who knew Bobbie could pilot a biplane?
Kenneth Bruce Quenneville MD
Son
August 6, 2020
Yes, it is true that my "step-mother" and I graduated the same year, from USF, 1981. What can I say, my father was a stud in great demand! From left to right, Irene (Earls' mother), me (Ken, son), The Stud (Earl), Bobbie (Stud-ette) and Rene (Earl's father).
Kenneth Bruce Quenneville MD
Son
August 6, 2020
Proud husband Earl with his lovely young wife, Bobbie, at graduation from University of South Florida, 1981.
Kenneth Bruce Quenneville MD
Son
August 6, 2020
Captain Earl in firm command of his first and second mate (grandchildren Genny, left, and Ariel, right) in the Virgin Islands, about 2007.
Kenneth Bruce Quenneville MD
Son
August 6, 2020
Earl and Bobbie in their natural habitat, aboard a 45 ft. catamaran anchored off the British Virgin Islands, about 2007. Partly paid for from insurance collected from my crashed airplane (no one hurt!).
Kenneth Bruce Quenneville MD
Son
August 6, 2020
Sporty young Earl June 1960, with 3rd son Steven, Burke Avenue, Tampa.
Kenneth Bruce Quenneville MD
Son
August 6, 2020
Is that Earl? Yes, the slim, handsome and racy version in front of the Austin Healy on Burke Avenue in Tampa. My love of speed may have come from the occasional outing to "burn the carbon off the plugs". Don't tell my mother.
Kenneth Bruce Quenneville MD
Son
August 6, 2020
West Bay Street in Tampa, about 2015, family photo (all Quennevilles). From left to right, Earl, Genny (grand daughter), Ariel (front, grand daughter), Ken (son) and Bobbie.
Kenneth Bruce Quenneville MD
Son
August 6, 2020
St. Croix days, 1960's. Earl (front, left) and best friend Richard (Dick) Speas, the "shark whisperer".
Kenneth Bruce Quenneville MD
Son
August 6, 2020
Nice picture of Earl and Bobbie, 2012
Kenneth Bruce Quenneville MD
Son
August 5, 2020
Two peas in a pod - Earl and grandson Daniel loved spending time together and were so much alike. They both relished building models and hanging out like this "rocker moment" during a visit to Tampa's zoo. Earl was so proud when Daniel earned his degree in civil engineering and recently passed his Professional Engineers' exam.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
August 5, 2020
My name is Ken Quenneville, Earl's first son.
Although volumes could be written about his intelligence, kindness, creativity and love, he was a man of monumental integrity. For a man with no religious tendencies or interest in the spiritual side of things, he possessed phenomenal moral fiber without a hint of judgement. His father, my Pip Rene's, favorite motto was "Everything in moderation", the epitome of tolerance, understanding, and the value of self-control. Rene’s main role as Colonel in the Army was with the Core of Engineers (did I mention Quenneville’s like to build things?). Rene’s considerable wisdom is reflected in his being called upon to judge in cases of Court Marshal. I mention this as a suggestion of the genetic and environmental influence leading to Dad’s decidedly cerebral proclivity.
In the 60’s, Dad was ahead of his time. Although a “long hair hippie” only in later years, his forward thinking was termed “Avant Guard” in the language of the day. Although in the early years he was a fan of Tiajuana Brass and Henry Bellefonte, Dad introduced ME to James Taylor. This untethered but deeply organized mind was a true boon to a child being raised by this Master. Let me share some childhood memories
At about 7 years old, while watching him shave, I asked about infinity (common sort of topic). Smiling, and always drawing, he drew little Kenny in a spaceship and imagined him speeding beyond the galaxies. Then he would draw a line and said, “This is the end of space”. OK, whatever you say, Master. “But what is on the other side? MORE SPACE!” Seven year old brain explodes!
Maybe I am now 10 years old at my next memory. I had a school project to compare and contrast Communism and Capitalism. Keep in mind we lived in Tampa Florida, it was around the time of the Cuban Missile Crisis (for example, Dad had lots of Civil Defense architectural projects designing Fallout Shelters), and we lived a few miles from Mac Dill Air force Base, a potential target. I actually was shown in Elementary School that famous video showing how protective climbing under your desk can be in the event of a nuclear blast. The family practiced reinforcing the fortitude of our kitchen table with stacked books and drilled in ventures out into the radioactive fog to use the bathroom and other such tasks. In spite of the understandable tendency for bias, Dad described idealized versions of both systems without prejudice, completely ignoring known flaws on both sides.
Dad spent a lot of time at his drafting board, set up in an outdoor porch converted to an office on Burke Avenue in Tampa. Probably motivated to foster creativity in his son, he never complained about me using his drafting table for drawing. All his fancy tools for drawing curved and precisely straight lines were at my disposal! The electric eraser and pencil sharpener were huge pleasures! Certainly I must have left all kinds of mess behind, but I never heard a single grumble. Often I found myself playing at his feet while he worked. There would be times he would just stare off into space, put his pencil down, and just THINK. His face was engraved with intense concentration and deep contemplation, but with a sense of poised readiness, like a cat about to pounce on an idea and devour it. I think he called in “belly button gazing”. It may have been some kind of seizure, but I’d like to think at those times he was grappling with solutions for the world’s problems.
A unique man, to say the least. He died like he lived life, with grace and equipoise. Thank God for our dear Bobbie, whose undivided and legendary dedication made his passing a thing to be emulated. Although he had many months of weight loss, worsening weakness and shortness of breath (we originally thought it was his heart), once the facts were known, he passed quietly in less than 3 weeks with minimal, if any, distress. He was cradled and cared for like a king with loving devotion by his angel. Thank you, Bobbie.

Kenneth Bruce Quenneville MD
Son
August 4, 2020
Earl was not materialistic - he preferred experiences over purchased things. So, my birthday gift for him one year was a flight together in an open cockpit biplane. We soared above Polk County's landscape in the morning sky. The rush of wind and hum of the engine blocked out everything else - we couldn't stop smiling at each other. It felt timeless just like our love for each other.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
August 3, 2020
There was no greater gift than to share one's passion with those you love and Earl did just that with our grandchildren on so many levels. And they returned his love. He was so proud when his granddaughters created original works of art as gifts for his 90th birthday.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
August 2, 2020
Earl loved it when a "tall ship" would visit Tampa and berth outboard of the American Victory Ship. In this photo, he admires what I believe was a Danish training ship. As a boy, Earl's Uncle Peter would take him aboard the USS Constitution (Old Ironsides), docked in Boston. Peter was a rigger on the Constitution and taught Earl all the names for the standing rigging. It became Earl's "unofficial" playground and he became sort of an unofficial mascot of the ship's workers back in the 1930s.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
August 1, 2020
What I will remember most about Earl is the way he loved my dear friend Bobbie. When he looked at her, his eyes sparkled, and her face would shine back. It was a privilege to witness such a tender, caring and supportive partnership. The definition of true love. I will forever be thankful to them both for their love and friendship -- and for welcoming me with open arms into their lives. I consider myself incredibly lucky to have shared moments talking openly and laughing deeply together. I am thankful to Earl for loving my darling Bobbie the way you know your most cherished friend deserves. You are remembered with so much joy.
Lottie Mae Watts
Friend
August 1, 2020
Earl Quenneville was one of the most accomplished, intelligent, talented, and among the kindest humans I've ever known. I had the great honor of meeting Earl more than thirty years ago. My dear friend and news colleague was his darling love, Bobbie O'Brien. Of course, Bobbie had told me so much about Earl prior to getting to meet him. Bobbie's love, admiration and respect for Earl is legendary, and rightly so. My favorite memories of Earl and Bobbie are sitting in their living room surrounded by Earl's magnificent art works and architectural pieces, and talking about every subject under the sun. There was seemingly no subject that Earl and Bobbie weren't incredibly well-versed to discuss. But, the best moments were when Earl and Bobbie would look over at each other, their eyes locked on each other, and the sweet smiles that would instantly spread across their face. Their love was truly one for the ages. It was pure joy to be in their presence, and I will remember and reflect on their passion for each other, their passion for life, their passion for what is beautiful and right in this world, their passion to right the wrongs of injustice and inhumanity, for the rest of my life.
Colleen Hamilton
Friend
August 1, 2020
What a gift - to have a partner like Earl who remained playful throughout our 42 years and to his final days. He teased and tickled and made up games. Always joyful - never mean spirited - we never had a day together when we didn't laugh even if it was just at ourselves.
Bobbie OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
July 31, 2020
Earl Quenneville was my uncle and godfather. He was one of the most intelligent, kindest, funniest, and caring people I have ever had the pleasure of meeting. He was a phenomenal uncle and godfather, and his greatness in those roles is only surpassed by what a wonder husband he was to his wife and life partner of more than 40 years, and my aunt/godmother, Bobbie. You are sorely missed, but I am sure that you are staring down from heaven to continue to be a bright light to so many. I love you Uncle Earl!
Sean Phillippi
Family
July 31, 2020
To his grandchildren, Earl was just Pip, short for the French pépère. He was equally comfortable showing them how to make models or playing house. And he reveled at the opportunity to share his beloved American Victory Ship - giving them tours aboard and even making a pull-toy replica for his granddaughters. He was unique.
Roberta OBrien-Quenneville
Spouse
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