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Gerrit Johan Steven WILDE

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Gerrit Johan Steven WILDE Obituary
DR. GERRIT JOHAN STEVEN WILDE 'Gerry' Passed away peacefully after a short illness in a hospital in Oaxaca, Mexico on New Year's Day, 2019. Born in Groningen, the Netherlands in 1932, he immigrated to Canada with his wife Antoinette and their two children Annette and Niels in 1964. He was an internationally renowned researcher and professor emeritus of Psychology at Queen's University Kingston. His sometimes controversial theory of Risk Homeostasis has been studied the world over. He left an indelible impact on many young minds and contemporaries. For Gerry, there were no sacred cows-all so-called conventional wisdom was fair game and could, indeed should, be challenged. In later life, his love for the Canadian countryside as well as international travel continued with his loving wife Dawn Elizabeth Clarke. A true loss to his grandchildren and great-grandchildren Aidan, Sebastian, Shawna and Ashley who enjoyed his cheerful, friendly and intellectual curiosity. His thirst for new experiences, knowledge, and understanding never left him throughout his successful life and career. His final adventure being to spend eternity in the Sierra Madre mountains of Oaxaca. Everyone is most welcome to attend his memorial on January 20, 2019 at 3 p.m. in Sydenham St. United Church in Kingston. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Amnesty International. Further references: http://riskhomeostasis.org https://www.cbc.ca/radio/spark/driver-safety-and-the-psychology-of-risk-1.3445993?autoplay=true "Making things safer can be a risky business...Professor Wilde responds that because his theory focuses on motivation it emphasizes the positive. Instead of viewing human beings as passive subjects of technical designs or enforcement, we should treat them as active subjects and look for ways to make them want to be safer." Dan Keegan, The Globe and Mail, Toronto
Published in The Globe and Mail from Jan. 12 to Jan. 16, 2019
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