Home
Resources
More Obituaries for Bevars Mabry
Looking for an obituary for a different person with this name?

Bevars DuPré Mabry


1928 - 2019
Bevars DuPré Mabry Obituary
(News story) Bevars DuPré Mabry, a retired economics professor at Bowling Green State University who was a former department chairman and did research in labor relations, collective bargaining, and development of labor institutions, died Oct. 1 in Hospice of Northwest Ohio, South Detroit Avenue. He was 91.

He died of prostate cancer, his wife of 58 years, Mary Jeanne Connelly Mabry, also a retired BGSU professor, said.

Mr. Mabry retired in 1992, after 32 years of teaching economics at BGSU. Hired in 1959 and appointed a full professor of economics a few years later, he was the department chair in the 1960s and 1970s; he also mentored new faculty. Before that, he taught at the University of Idaho.

At BGSU, he was instrumental in developing the economics department, his wife said. He also was one of the first faculty to teach at what now is BGSU's Firelands campus.

In retirement, Mr. Mabry taught one semester a year for three years in BGSU's optional supplemental-teaching program for retired faculty.

A Rockefeller Foundation grantee, Mr. Mabry also taught economics at Thammasat University in Bangkok from 1967 to 1968 and then from 1971 to 1973 as a visiting professor.

He was an author of several acclaimed publications on labor relations such as his 1973 book, Economics of Manpower and the Labor Market.

Mr. Mabry published extensively on labor relations, collective bargaining, development of labor institutions, and econometrics in professional journals, his wife said, adding that they both helped develop the field of Economics of the Arts.

His professional memberships included American Economics Association and several honorary organizations.

Ms. Mabry said that his students – both undergraduate and graduate – liked him and that he was generous with giving credit to those who helped him with his research work.

"He had a great mind, an amazing mind. He was interested in so many things besides economics such as art, literature, and history and culture of different countries," Ms. Mabry said, adding that they often had international students from a variety of countries staying at their house.

She also said he was "a husband before his time," meaning that he loved spending most of his free time with his children and enjoyed helping her with keeping up the household.

Mr. Mabry was born July 7, 1928 in Atlanta to Kathryn and Jerry Mabry.

He was raised in Toccoa, Ga., graduating from high school in 1945. He then studied for a year at what now is University of Tennessee in Chattanooga.

In 1946, Mr. Mabry volunteered in the Army and then served at an Army base in Japan until his honorable discharge in 1947 with the rank of private first class.

Once back from the service, he used his GI Bill to complete his education at the University of Tennessee, graduating in 1950 with a bachelor's degree in business administration.

He later obtained a master's degree from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and a doctorate from Tulane University, New Orleans, in 1954 and 1959 respectively, both in economics.

In his free time, he enjoyed the company of his family at a lakeside cottage in Northern Michigan. He also enjoyed traveling in America and overseas.

He was preceded in death by three brothers.

Surviving are his wife, Mary Jeanne Connelly Mabry; son, Michael Mabry; daughter, Maria Mabry Westerfield; brother, Fred Mabry, and three grandchildren.

Visitation will be at 10 a.m. Saturday at Corpus Christi University Parish in Toledo, where a funeral Mass will immediately follow at 11 a.m.

The family suggests tributes to the Fr. James Bacik Endowed Chair in Theological Studies at Lourdes University, or to Hospice of Northwest Ohio.

This is a news story by Mike Sigov. Contact him at [email protected] or 419-724-6089.
Published in The Blade on Oct. 8, 2019
Read More
Give others a chance to express condolences. Not right now.
Inform family & friends of Bevars's passing.
- ADVERTISEMENT -