CHARLES "Charlie" GAMBRILL

Notice
3 entries
  • "You told me time and time again you would live to be 100..."
    - Mona Gambrill
  • "I will miss you Charlie, we had great conversations over..."
    - Ronald Hardee
  • "He packed a lot into his 98 years and started every day..."
    - Richard Gambrill
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CHARLES A. GAMBRILL "Charlie"  

Charlie Gambrill died peacefully on July 31, 2018 in the Winchester, Virginia Medical Center. He was one month shy of his 98th birthday. He was born in Wellington, Kansas, to Josephine Ryan Gambrill and Frank Gambrill He graduated from Catholic University with a degree in philosophy in 1941 and immediately enlisted in the US Navy. Lt. Gambrill commanded an LCT during World War II and participated in six invasions in the Mediterranean theater for which he received a unit citation. After discharge from the Navy, he settled in Kansas City, received a degree from the University of Missouri's Kansas City School of Law and began a forty year plus career in real estate, which continued after his move to Washington, DC in the 1950's.. There he was known, primarily, for the redevelopment of the Investment Building on K Street NW. He was a long time member of the University Club, in Kansas city and Washington DC, and a regular player in the bridge games. In 1968, he moved to his beloved farm "Borleagh Manor" in County Wexford, Ireland, where he bred race horses and raised cattle. In 1979 he moved to Bermuda where he enjoyed 37 years playing bridge, boating and fishing. For the past year he has been a resident of The Village at Orchard Ridge, a Lutheran Retirement Community, in Winchester, Virginia.
He is survived by his companion and wife of 41 years, Mona Marie; and five sons by a previous marriage, Matthew (Carmen), Charles Jr. (Mary), Stephen (Wynn), Richard (Lynn), and Peter (Arlene). His only daughter Monica Claire Gambrill d'Amador (Jorge) predeceased him. He also leaves 12 grandchildren
A celebration of Charlie's life will be held later this year.

Published in The Washington Post on Sept. 9, 2018