SUSAN SHANK (1938 - 2020)

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SUSAN E. SHANK  
December 23, 1938~January 5, 2020  

Susan Elizabeth Shank, daughter of Donald Jay and Ruth Rabe Shank, grew up in Scarsdale, NY, graduated Cornell University's College of Industrial and Labor Relations, was a dedicated career civil servant who worked for the US Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics starting in the Kennedy administration in DC, moving to the San Francisco regional office for many years, and then back to DC until her retirement in 1994. She was active in civil rights, social justice, and feminism throughout her life.
Susan was exceptionally proud of her "baby brother," Dr. Peter Rabe Shank, Professor Emeritus of Medical Science at Brown University, and loved to brag about him and his achievements. Susan married Kenneth Clay Holland Sr. in 1963. Together they raised two daughters (Jennifer and Sherry Holland) and her stepson Ken Jr. (Fritz).
Susan traveled extensively, and lived her final years in Santa Barbara, CA, overlooking the Pacific Ocean. She enjoyed many walks along the bluffs with friends, family, neighbors, and her sheltie, Melbourne.
She is survived by her daughters Jennifer and Sherry Holland and their families, her stepson Ken Jr., her brother Peter (Kathy) Shank, and an amazing array of family and friends. She was predeceased by her nephew, Jeffrey Shank.
A memorial celebration will be held at a later date.
 
In lieu of flowers please consider a gift to one of the causes Susan supported:
• League of Women Voters of Santa Barbara https://my.lwv.org/california/santa-barbara/donate
• The Jeffrey Shank '02 Endowed Scholarship at the Moses Brown School https://mosesbrown.myschoolapp.com/page/give-online?siteId=1322&ssl=1
• The Peter Rabe Shank, Ph.D. Medical Scholarship (established by Susan in honor of her brother) http://brown.edu/go/shank-scholarship

Published in The Washington Post on Jan. 12, 2020
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