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Peter Mansfield (1933 - 2017)

Getty / AFP / Sven Nackstrand

Peter Mansfield (1933 - 2017)

Peter Mansfield, a British scientist and co-winner of the 2003 Nobel Prize for his work in inventing the revolutionary MRI scanner, died Wednesday, Feb. 8, 2017. He was 83.

The University of Nottingham, where Mansfield taught, announced the death in a Facebook post.

"It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Professor Sir Peter Mansfield. Sir Peter pioneered the creation of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), one of the most important and revolutionary breakthroughs in modern medical science. Awarded with a Nobel Prize for his work in 2003, his continued drive for discovery has been truly inspirational.

"Our hearts and thoughts are with his family and friends."


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Mansfield, who was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II in 1993, won the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine along with American Paul C. Lauterbur, a chemist.

Magnetic resonance imaging is a noninvasive procedure that uses radio waves and magnetic fields, not X-rays, to create 3-D images, thus allowing medical doctors to detect changes in a patient's body and helping them to make a diagnosis.

Mansfield was born Oct. 9, 1933, in London. Two years after receiving his 1962 doctorate in physics, he joined the University of Nottingham as a lecturer in his field of expertise.

A statement from Mansfield's family, released by the university, praised the scientist and family man.

"As well as being an eminent scientist and pioneer in his field, he was also a loving and devoted husband, father, and grandfather who will be hugely missed by all the family."

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