Born October 22

Actress Joan Fontaine appeared in dozens of movies and television shows, receiving many accolades for her work, but two stand out as unique. Fontaine is the only actor to have won an Academy Award for an Alfred Hitchcock film, 1941's "Suspicion." Additionally, she and her sister, Olivia de Havilland, are the only siblings who both won Academy Award statues for acting in leading roles. Fontaine's other notable credits include movies "Rebecca" and "The Constant Nymph," for which she was nominated for an Oscar, as well as a role on the TV soap opera "Ryan's Hope." We remember Fontaine's life today as well as the lives of other notable people who were born this day in history.

Click to discover notable people who died this day in history including actor Cleavon Little.

1964: Drazen Petrovic, Croatian Hall of Fame guard who was a star on the Croatian national team and later played in the NBA for the New Jersey Nets, averaging more than 22 points a game in his final season, is born in Sibenik, Croatia.

1949: Stiv Bators, U.S. vocalist and guitarist known best as a member of the punk band the Dead Boys and then the rock band the Lords of the New Church, is born in Youngstown, Ohio.

1943: Catherine Coulson, U.S. actress best known as the quirky log lady on the TV series "Twin Peaks," is born in Elmhurst, Illinois.

1942: Annette Funicello, U.S. actress who was remembered best for "The Mickey Mouse Club" and beach party films with singer Frankie Avalon, is born in Utica, New York.

The former Mouseketeer, singing star, and teen idol is deeply missed, as evidenced by the 1,000-plus fans who signed her Guest Book within 24 hours of its creation. In their comments posted to the Guest Book, they remembered all the things that made America love her. Read more

 

 

 

1942: Bobby Fuller, U.S. singer-songwriter and guitarist who formed the Bobby Fuller Four and had a hit song in 1966 with "I Fought the Law," is born in Baytown, Texas.

Bobby Fuller (Photo: Wikimedia Commons)The band was a bit of a throwback. While the British Invasion and Motown dominated the airwaves, the Bobby Fuller Four played what was basically 1950s-style rock, inspired by the likes of Little Richard, Eddie Cochran, and the Everly Brothers. Still, the group managed to chart with “Let Her Dance” in 1966. In a bizarre promotional turn, they appeared in the movie "The Ghost in the Invisible Bikini," starring Nancy Sinatra and Boris Karloff, where they lip-synched two songs by another band. Read more

 

 

1941: Charles Keating, English actor known best for his role as Carl Hutchins on the soap opera "Another World," is born in London, England.

Charles Keating (Photo by Ron Galella, Ltd./WireImage)He starred on "All My Children" and "Another World." He also appeared in the movie "The Bodyguard," according to his obituary by Reuters. His work as Carl Hutchins on "Another World" garnered the actor an Emmy in 1996. Read more

 

 

 

1931: Ann Rule, U.S. true crime author known for her book "The Stranger Beside Me" about a former co-worker, the serial killer Ted Bundy, is born in Lowell, Michigan. 

1925: Dory Previn, U.S. singer-songwriter who wrote many songs for movies with her then-husband, Andre Previn, is born in Rahway, New Jersey.

1925: Slater Martin, U.S. basketball Hall of Fame guard for the Los Angeles Lakers, is born in Elmina, Texas.

1920: Timothy Leary, U.S. psychologist and writer known for his advocacy of psychedelic drugs who was a symbol of the counterculture in the 1960s, is born in Springfield, Massachusetts.

1912: Frances Drake, U.S. actress known best for playing Eponine in "Les Miserables" in 1935, is born in New York, New York.

1907: Jimmie Foxx, U.S. Major League Baseball Hall of Fame first baseman who hit more than 530 home runs and was a nine-time All-Star, is born in Sudlersville, Maryland.

1904: Constance Bennett, U.S. actress who was a movie star in the 1930s and '40s and starred in the "Topper" movies, is born in New York, New York.

1903: Curly Howard, U.S. actor who was one of the Three Stooges, is born in Brooklyn, New York.

In 1934, the Stooges signed a contract with Columbia Pictures and became immediate audience favorites. They were nominated for an Academy Award for 1934's "Men in Black" and even lampooned Adolf Hitler in 1940's "You Nazty Spy!" and "I'll Never Heil Again" in 1941. Their work in this period, from 1935 to 1941, is what we think of as "classic Stooges," with films like "Hoi Polloi," "Disorder in the Court," and "A Plumbing We Will Go." These were the films that cemented their star status and kept them in high demand for years. Read more

 

 

 

1844: Sarah Bernhardt, French actress who was a star during the late 19th and early 20th centuries, is born in Paris, France.

1811: Franz Liszt, Hungarian composer and pianist who was highly influential and considered one of the great pianists of all time, is born in Raiding, Hungary.

1734: Daniel Boone, U.S. pioneer and frontiersman whose exploits made him one of the first U.S. folk heroes, is born in Oley Valley, Pennsylvania.

Click to discover notable people who died this day in history including actor Cleavon Little.