Mary Martin / AP Photo / Ed Ford

Celebrities who died November 3 in history

We remember famous people who died this day, November 3, in history, including Broadway star Mary Martin.

2014

TOM MAGLIOZZI, U.S. radio host who was one of the stars of NPR's "Car Talk," dies at 77. Magliozzi and his brother Ray were the co-hosts of NPR's weekly radio show, Car Talk, where they were known as "Click and Clack, the Tappet Brothers." When Tom died at 77, people around the world remembered his incredible life and his humorous take on auto repair.  Read more

 

 

 

2010

Jerry Bock (AP Photo)JERRY BOCK, U.S. musical theater composer and Pulitzer Prize winner, dies at 81. Bock said in 2004 that his favorite moment in the creation of a song was playing it with his collaborator. "If it works, we say, 'Wow!'" Bock said, according to his obituary by The Associated Press. "There's no reward like it to finish a song and celebrate it with your partner." Read more

 

2009

CARL BALLANTINE, U.S. magician and actor known as the Amazing Ballantine who starred on the sitcom "McHale's Navy," dies at 92.

 

2006

MARIE RUDISILL, U.S. author and television personality known as the Fruitcake Lady, dies at 95.

 

2002

JONATHAN HARRIS, U.S. character actor who played Dr. Zachary Smith on the 1960s TV show "Lost in Space," dies at 87.

LONNIE DONEGAN, English musician known as the King of Skiffle who inspired John Lennon and Pete Townshend, dies at 71. Donegan's hits included "Does Your Chewing Gum Lose Its Flavor (on the Bedpost Overnight)," "My Old Man's a Dustman," and "Rock Island Line," but he may have been more important to British music for inspiring young talents to imitate and then eclipse his success, according to his obituary by The Associated Press.

 

1998

BOB KANE, U.S. comic book artist and co-creator of DC Comics superhero "Batman," dies at 83. In 1939, Kane breathed life into a comic book hero who became a modern myth, thrilling the imaginations of generations of readers and fans. Kane's creation, known as Bat-Man, Batman, or Bruce Wayne (to a select few), began as an attempt to grab a share of the new market for superheroes. Read more

 

1994

DENNIS C. OTT, U.S. actor who played roles in "Skinheads" and "Star Trek III: The Search for Spock," dies at 36.

 

1993

LEON THEREMIN, Russian inventor of the electronic musical instrument that bears his name, dies at 97.

WILLIAM LANTEAU, U.S. character actor in more than 80 different TV shows and films, including "On Golden Pond," dies at 70.

 

1990

MARY MARTIN, U.S. actress, singer, and Broadway star and mother of actor Larry Hagman, dies of colorectal cancer at 76. Martin's Broadway dreams took her all the way from sleepy Weatherford, Texas, to Never Never Land and her Tony Award-winning performance as Peter Pan. After spending years trying to break into Broadway, Mary finally made it to the stage in Cole Porter's "Leave It to Me!" in 1938. She found success in "South Pacific," "I Do! I Do!," and several film and TV appearances throughout her career. A year before her death in 1990, she was honored at the Kennedy Center's annual awards, and is also immortalized on the Hollywood Walk of Fame twice: once for recording and once for radio. Read more

 

1989

DOROTHY FULDHEIM, U.S. journalist credited with being the first American woman to anchor a television news broadcast as well to host her own television show, dies at 96.

 

 

 

 

1986

EDDIE "LOCKJAW" DAVIS, U.S. jazz tenor saxophonist, dies at 64.

 

1964

JOHN HENRY BARBEE, U.S. blues singer and guitarist, dies at 58.

 

1954

HENRI MATISSE, French artist who was a leading figure in modern art, dies at 84.

 

1949

SOLOMON R. GUGGENHEIM, U.S. art collector and philanthropist who was the driving force behind the Guggenheim Museum, dies at 88.

 

1926

Annie Oakley (Library of Congress)ANNIE OAKLEY, U.S. sharpshooter and star of Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show, dies of pernicious anemia at 66. One of the most famous women of the Wild West was Oakley, whose skill as a sharpshooter earned her a place in Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show and rocketed her to fame as the first American female superstar. Oakley was an early advocate for women to serve in combat operations; she wrote a letter to President William McKinley offering the services of a troop of "50 lady sharpshooters" to help advance the Spanish-American War. Read more

 

 

 


Discover notable people born this day in history including tough-guy actor Charles Bronson.